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The role of location in evaluating racial wage disparity

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Author Info

  • Dan Black
  • Natalia Kolesnikova
  • Seth G. Sanders
  • Lowell J. Taylor

Abstract

A standard object of empirical analysis in labor economics is a modified Mincer wage function in which an individual's log wage is specified to be a function of education, experience, and an indicator variable identifying race. Researchers hope that estimates from this exercise can be informative about the impact of minority status on labor market success. Here we set out a theoretical justification for this regression in a context in which individuals live and work in different locations. Our model leads to the traditional approach, but with the important caveat that the regression should include location-specific fixed effects. Given this insight, we reevaluate evidence about the black-white wage disparity in the United States.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 2009-043.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2009-043

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Keywords: Income distribution ; Wages ; Discrimination in employment;

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  1. Harmon, Oskar R., 1988. "The income elasticity of demand for single-family owner-occupied housing: An empirical reconciliation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 173-185, September.
  2. Dan Black & Natalia Kolesnikova & Lowell J. Taylor, 2007. "Earnings functions when wages and prices vary by location," Working Papers 2007-031, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  3. Amitabh Chandra, 2000. "Labor-Market Dropouts and the Racial Wage Gap: 1940-1990," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 333-338, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Kevin Lang & Jee-Yeon K. Lehmann, 2012. "Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market: Theory and Empirics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(4), pages 959-1006, December.
  2. Roland G. Fryer , Jr. & Devah Pager & J�rg L. Spenkuch, 2013. "Racial Disparities in Job Finding and Offered Wages," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(3), pages 633 - 689.
  3. Dan A. Black & Natalia Kolesnikova & Lowell J. Taylor, 2010. "African-American economic progress in urban areas: a tale of 14 American cities," Working Papers 2010-015, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  4. Peter McHenry & Melissa McInerney, 2012. "Are Wage Premiums for Black Women Illusory? A Critical Examination," Working Papers 120, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  5. Winters, John V. & Hirsch, Barry, 2012. "An Anatomy of Racial and Ethnic Trends in Male Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 6766, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Dan A. Black & Natalia Kolesnikova & Lowell J. Taylor, 2010. "The economic progress of African Americans in urban areas: a tale of 14 cities," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 353-379.

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