Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Product cycles, innovation and relative wages in European countries

Contents:

Author Info

  • Alison Butler
  • Michael Dueker

Abstract

This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the theoretical literature examining how innovation affects income across countries and the empirical literature examining how relative wages within a country change over time. We test the hypothesis that the relative wage between workers in high-and low-technology industries within a country is a function of the rate of domestic innovation and innovation abroad. To test this hypothesis data for 7 European countries for the years 1971-1988 are used. The empirical results show that the relative rates of innovation (as measured by the ratio of patents to high-tech workers) are significant determinants of the relative wage.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/more/1994-022/
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/1994/94-022.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 1994-022.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1994
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of International Economics, February 1999 under title "Does Foreign Innovation Affect Domestic Wage Inequality?"
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:1994-022

Contact details of provider:
Postal: P.O. Box 442, St. Louis, MO 63166
Fax: (314)444-8753
Web page: http://www.stlouisfed.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Wages ; European Economic Community;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Zvi Griliches & Ariel Pakes & Bronwyn H. Hall, 1988. "The Value of Patents as Indicators of Inventive Activity," NBER Working Papers 2083, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Grossman, G.M. & Helpman, E., 1989. "Quality Ledders In The Theory Of Growth," Papers, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs 148, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs.
  3. Jacob Mincer, 1991. "Human Capital, Technology, and the Wage Structure: What Do Time Series Show?," NBER Working Papers 3581, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:1994-022. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Anna Xiao).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.