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Part-time work and industry growth

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  • Bruce C. Fallick

Abstract

The impression that employment in the U.S. has become more part-time intensive may be driven by a tendency for faster-growing industries to use more part-time work. I document this association over 1983-1993, and demonstrate that it is robust to alternative measures. Similar relationships are discernable in several countries. However, the association does not emerge clearly in the U.S. until the 1980s. Moreover, both relative growth rates and relative part-time intensities of industries have changed markedly since 1940. Part-time work at fast-growing industries is not more likely to be involuntary, although this may be true for entering workers, nor is there a trend in that direction.

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File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/1998/199816/199816abs.html
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File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/1998/199816/199816pap.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series Finance and Economics Discussion Series with number 1998-16.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:1998-16

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Keywords: Employment (Economic theory) ; Industries;

References

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  1. Fallick, Bruce Chelimsky, 1996. "The hiring of new labor by expanding industries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 25-42, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2004. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," IZA Discussion Papers 1124, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Even, William E. & Macpherson, David A., 2004. "Do Pensions Impede Phased Retirement?," IZA Discussion Papers 1353, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Lopez, TarĂ¡ Burnthorne & Babin, Barry J. & Chung, Christina, 2009. "Perceptions of ethical work climate and person-organization fit among retail employees in Japan and the US: A cross-cultural scale validation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(6), pages 594-600, June.
  4. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2006. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," CEPR Discussion Papers 5595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Rob Euwals & Maurice Hogerbrugge, 2004. "Explaining the growth of part-time employment; factors of supply and demand," CPB Discussion Paper 31, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  6. Hirsch, Barry, 2004. "Why Do Part-Time Workers Earn Less? The Role of Worker and Job Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 1261, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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