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Consumption-habits in a new Keynesian business cycle model

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  • Richard Dennis

Abstract

Consumption-habits have become an integral component in new Keynesian models. However, consumption-habits can be modeled in a host of different ways and this diversity is reflected in the literature. I examine whether different approaches to modeling consumption habits have important implications for business cycle behavior. Using a standard new Keynesian business cycle model, I show that, to a first-order log-approximation, the consumption Euler equation associated with the additive functional form for habit formation encompasses the multiplicative function form. Empirically, I show that whether consumption habits are internal or external has little effect on the model's business cycle characteristics.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its series Working Paper Series with number 2008-35.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2008-35

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Keywords: Business cycles;

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  1. Michele Boldrin & Lawrence J. Christiano & Jonas D. M. Fisher, 2000. "Habit persistence, asset returns and the business cycle," Staff Report 280, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Ryder, Harl E, Jr & Heal, Geoffrey M, 1973. "Optimum Growth with Intertemporally Dependent Preferences," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(1), pages 1-33, January.
  3. Uribe, Martin, 2002. "The price-consumption puzzle of currency pegs," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 533-569, April.
  4. Jeffery D. Amato & Thomas Laubach, 2001. "Implications of habit formation for optimal monetary policy," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2001-58, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Gruber, Joseph W., 2004. "A present value test of habits and the current account," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 1495-1507, October.
  6. McCallum, B.T. & Nelson, E., 1998. "Nominal Income Targeting in an Open-Economy Optimizing Model," Papers 644, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
  7. Jody Overland & Christopher D. Carroll & David N. Weil, 2000. "Saving and Growth with Habit Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 341-355, June.
  8. Andrew B. Abel, . "Asset Prices Under Habit Formation and Catching Up With the Jones," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 1-90, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  9. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe, 2004. "Deep Habits," 2004 Meeting Papers 208, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles Evans, 2001. "Nominal rigidities and the dynamic effects of a shock to monetary policy," Working Paper 0107, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Takashi Kano & James M. Nason, 2009. "Business Cycle Implications of Internal Consumption Habit for New Keynesian Model," CARF F-Series CARF-F-151, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
  2. Yasuo Hirose & Atsushi Inoue, 2013. "Zero Lower Bound and Parameter Bias in an Estimated DSGE Model," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 012, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
  3. Giorgio Motta & Patrizio Tirelli, 2012. "Income inequality and macroeconomic stability in a New Keynesian model with limited asset market participation," Working Papers 219, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2012.
  4. Fabio Milani & John Treadwell, 2011. "The Effects of Monetary Policy "News" and "Surprises"," Working Papers 101109, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  5. Richard Dennis, 2006. "The frequency of price adjustment and New Keynesian business cycle dynamics," Working Paper Series 2006-22, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  6. Rhee, Hyuk-jae & Turdaliev, Nurlan, 2012. "Optimal monetary policy in a small open economy with inflation and output persistence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2533-2542.
  7. Gareis, Johannes & Mayer, Eric, 2013. "Euler equations and money market interest rates: The role of monetary policy and risk premium shocks," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 27-31.
  8. Kapinos, Pavel, 2011. "Forward-looking monetary policy and anticipated shocks to inflation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 620-633.
  9. Gregory Erin Givens, 2008. "Unemployment Insurance in a Sticky-Price Model with Worker Moral Hazard," Working Papers 200807, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance.
  10. Givens, Gregory, 2013. "Deep or aggregate habit formation? Evidence from a new-Keynesian business cycle model," MPRA Paper 45204, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Kano, Takashi & Nason, James M., 2012. "Appendix: Business Cycle Implications of Internal Consumption Habit for New Keynesian Models," Discussion Papers 2012-08, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
  12. Gareis, Johannes & Mayer, Eric, 2012. "Euler equations and money market interest rates: The role of monetary and risk premium shocks," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 89, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.
  13. Mumtaz, Haroon & Surico, Paolo, 2011. "Estimating the Aggregate Consumption Euler Equation with State-Dependent Parameters," CEPR Discussion Papers 8233, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Hall, Jamie, 2012. "Consumption dynamics in general equilibrium," MPRA Paper 43933, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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