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Why stop there? Mexican migration to the U.S. border region

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Author Info

  • Pia M. Orrenius
  • Madeline Zavodny
  • Leslie Lukens

Abstract

The transformation of the U.S. border economy since the 1980s provides a fascinating backdrop to explore how migration to the U.S-side of the Mexican border has changed vis-a-vis migration to the U.S. interior. Some long-standing patterns of border migrants remained unchanged during this period while others underwent drastic changes. For example, border migrants are consistently more likely to be female, to have migrated within Mexico, and to lack migrant networks as compared with migrants to the U.S. interior. Meanwhile, the occupational profile of border migrants has changed drastically from being predominately agricultural work to being largely made up of service-sector and sales-related work. Border migration is more sensitive to Mexican and U.S. business cycles than migration to the U.S. interior throughout the period and, while the data suggest border migrant wages may have caught up to other migrants' wages by the early 2000s, multivariate analysis indicates that border migrants who are female and/or undocumented continue to earn far less than such migrants who work in the U.S. interior.

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File URL: http://dallasfed.org/assets/documents/research/papers/2008/wp0803.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Working Papers with number 0803.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddwp:0803

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Keywords: Emigration and immigration;

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References

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  1. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," NBER Working Papers 12141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Davila, Alberto & Pagan, Jose A & Grau, Montserrat Viladrich, 1999. " Immigration Reform, the INS, and the Distribution of Interior and Border Enforcement Resources," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 99(3-4), pages 327-45, June.
  3. Gordon H. Hanson & Antonio Spilimbergo, 1996. "Illegal Immigration, Border Enforcement, and Relative Wages: Evidence from Apprehensions at the U.S.-Mexico Border," IDB Publications 6798, Inter-American Development Bank.
  4. Pia M. Orrenius, 2001. "Illegal immigration and enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border; an overview," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q I, pages 2-11.
  5. Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L, 1986. "Can Border Industries Be a Substitute for Immigration?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 263-68, May.
  6. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2001. "Self-selection among undocumented immigrants from Mexico," Working Paper 2001-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  7. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2002. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," NBER Working Papers 9242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Chiquiar, Daniel, 2008. "Globalization, regional wage differentials and the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 70-93, January.
  9. Edward P. Lazear, 2007. "Mexican Assimilation in the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 107-121 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Raymond Robertson, 2006. "Globalization and Mexican labor markets," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 61-80.
  11. Pia M. Orrenius & Anna L. Berman, 2002. "Growth on the border or bordering on growth ?," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue May, pages 1 - 8.
  12. Belinda I. Reyes & Laura Mameesh, 2002. "Why Does Immigrant Trip Duration Vary Across U.S. Destinations?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 83(2), pages 580-593.
  13. George J. Borjas & Lawrence F. Katz, 2007. "The Evolution of the Mexican-Born Workforce in the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 13-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Eric Dittmar & Keith R. Phillips, 1999. "Border region makes progress in the 1990s," Vista 4, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
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Cited by:
  1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Myriam Quispe-Agnoli, 2008. "The labor market experience and impact of undocumented workers," Working Paper 2008-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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