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An experimental study of circuit breakers: the effects of mandated market closures and temporary halts on market behavior

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  • Lucy F. Ackert
  • Bryan K. Church
  • Narayanan Jayaraman

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effect of circuit breakers on price behavior, trading volume, and profit-making ability in a market setting. We conduct nine experimental asset markets to compare behavior across three regulatory regimes: market closure, temporary halt, and no interruption. The presence of a circuit breaker rule does not affect the magnitude of the absolute deviation in price from fundamental value or trading profit. The primary driver of behavior is information asymmetry in the market. By comparison, trading activity is significantly affected by the presence of a circuit breaker. Mandated market closures cause market participants to advance trades.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its series Working Paper with number 99-1.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:99-1

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Keywords: Financial markets ; Flow of funds ; Stock market;

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  1. Gerety, Mason S & Mulherin, J Harold, 1992. " Trading Halts and Market Activity: An Analysis of Volume at the Open and the Close," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(5), pages 1765-84, December.
  2. Copeland, Thomas E & Friedman, Daniel, 1992. "The Market Value of Information: Some Experimental Results," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 241-66, April.
  3. Ma, C.K. & Rao, R.P. & Sears, R.S., 1988. "Limit Moves And Price Resolution: The Case Of The Treasury Bond Futures Markets," Papers 177, Columbia - Center for Futures Markets.
  4. Sanford J Grossman & Joseph E Stiglitz, 1997. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1908, David K. Levine.
  5. Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1994. " Circuit Breakers and Market Volatility: A Theoretical Perspective," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 237-54, March.
  6. Daniel Friedman, 1982. "Price Formation in Double Auction Markets," UCLA Economics Working Papers 278, UCLA Department of Economics.
  7. Greenwald, Bruce C. & Stein, Jeremy C., 1991. "Transactional Risk, Market Crashes, and the Role of Circuit Breakers," Scholarly Articles 3710666, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-35, November.
  9. Ackert, Lucy F. & Church, Bryan K. & Shehata, Mohamed, 1997. "Market behavior in the presence of costly, imperfect information: Experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 61-74, May.
  10. Isaac, R Mark & Plott, Charles R, 1981. "Price Controls and the Behavior of Auction Markets: An Experimental Examination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 448-59, June.
  11. Grossman, Sanford J & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1976. "Information and Competitive Price Systems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 246-53, May.
  12. Ackert, Lucy F. & Church, Bryan K., 1998. "Information dissemination and the distribution of wealth: Evidence from experimental asset markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 357-371, November.
  13. Smith, Vernon L & Suchanek, Gerry L & Williams, Arlington W, 1988. "Bubbles, Crashes, and Endogenous Expectations in Experimental Spot Asset Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(5), pages 1119-51, September.
  14. Forsythe, Robert & Palfrey, Thomas R & Plott, Charles R, 1982. "Asset Valuation in an Experimental Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 537-67, May.
  15. Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1995. "On rules versus discretion in procedures to halt trade," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-16, February.
  16. Forsythe, Robert & Palfrey, Thomas R & Plott, Charles R, 1984. " Futures Markets and Informational Efficiency: A Laboratory Examination," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(4), pages 955-81, September.
  17. Smith, Vernon L & Williams, Arlington W, 1981. "On Nonbinding Price Controls in a Competitive Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 467-74, June.
  18. Sunder, S., 1989. "Market For Information: Experimental Evidence," GSIA Working Papers 88-89-53, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  19. Williams, Arlington W, 1980. "Computerized Double-Auction Markets: Some Initial Experimental Results," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(3), pages 235-58, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lucy F. Ackert & Bryan K. Church & Narayanan Jayaraman, 2002. "Circuit breakers with uncertainty about the presence of informed agents: I know what you know . . . I think," Working Paper 2002-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  2. Hsieh, Ping-Hung & Kim, Yong H. & Yang, J. Jimmy, 2009. "The magnet effect of price limits: A logit approach," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 830-837, December.
  3. Michael A. Goldstein & Kenneth A. Kavajecz, . "Liquidity Provision during Circuit Breakers and Extreme Market Movements," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 1-00, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  4. Darren Duxbury, 2005. "Experimental evidence on trading behavior, market efficiency and price formation in double auctions with unknown trading duration," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(8), pages 475-497.
  5. Hai-Chuan Xu & Wei Zhang & Yi-Fang Liu, 2013. "Short-term Market Reaction after Trading Halts in Chinese Stock Market," Papers 1309.1138, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2014.
  6. Xu, Hai-Chuan & Zhang, Wei & Liu, Yi-Fang, 2014. "Short-term market reaction after trading halts in Chinese stock market," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 401(C), pages 103-111.
  7. Dean Johnson & Patrick Joyce, 2012. "Bubbles and Crashes Revisited," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 2, pages 29-42, August.
  8. James Brugler & Oliver Linton, 2014. "Single stock circuit breakers on the London Stock Exchange: do they improve subsequent market quality?," CeMMAP working papers CWP07/14, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

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