Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Assessing the welfare impact of the 2001 tax reform on dual-earner families

Contents:

Author Info

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss
  • Robert E. Moore

Abstract

We assess the 2001 income tax reform to determine its welfare impact across families with different characteristics. A household labor supply model is estimated to account for variable behavioral responses by family type. We find that while higher-education families received a larger share of the welfare gain generated from lower marginal tax rates, it was the lower-education families that provided the bulk of the additional labor supply motivated by the tax reform. We also find differing welfare gains across families with different numbers of children, highlighting the importance of allowing responses to vary across family characteristics when assessing the welfare impact of a policy change.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.frbatlanta.org/filelegacydocs/wp0727.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its series Working Paper with number 2007-27.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2007-27

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 1000 Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309
Phone: 404-521-8500
Email:
Web page: http://www.frbatlanta.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Burtless, Gary & Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "The Effect of Taxation on Labor Supply: Evaluating the Gary Negative Income Tax Experiments," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(6), pages 1103-30, December.
  2. Robert A Moffitt & Mark Wilhelm, 2000. "Taxation and the Labor Supply - Decisions of the Affluent," Economics Working Paper Archive 414, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
  3. Moore, Robert E., 1996. "Ranking income distributions using the Geometric Mean and a related general measure," MPRA Paper 10171, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Robert E. Moore & Mary Mathewes Kassis & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 1997. "Running hard and falling behind: A welfare analysis of two-earner families," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 237-250.
  5. Leora Friedberg & Anthony Webb, 2006. "Determinants and Consequences of Bargaining Power in Households," NBER Working Papers 12367, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Auerbach, Alan J., 2002. "The Bush Tax Cut and National Saving," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 55(3), pages 387-407, September.
  7. Thomas J. Kniesner & James P. Ziliak, 2000. "Tax Reform and Automatic Stabilization," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0788, Econometric Society.
  8. Eissa, Nada & Kleven, Henrik Jacobsen & Kreiner, Claus Thustrup, 2008. "Evaluation of four tax reforms in the United States: Labor supply and welfare effects for single mothers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(3-4), pages 795-816, April.
  9. Bargain, Olivier & Moreau, Nicolas, 2003. "Is the Collective Model of Labor Supply Useful for Tax Policy Analysis? A Simulation Exercise," Cahiers de recherche 0308, CIRPEE.
  10. Eissa, Nada & Liebman, Jeffrey B, 1996. "Labor Supply Response to the Earned Income Tax Credit," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 111(2), pages 605-37, May.
  11. Daniel Feenberg & Elisabeth Coutts, 1993. "An introduction to the TAXSIM model," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 189-194.
  12. Noonan, Mary C. & Smith, Sandra S. & Corcoran, Mary E., 2005. "Examining the Impact of Welfare Reform, Labor Market Conditions, and the Earned Income Tax Credit on the Employment of Black and White Single Mothers," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt7x25h6h3, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Myriam Quispe-Agnoli, 2009. "Employer monopsony power in the labor market for undocumented workers," Working Paper 2009-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2007-27. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Meredith Rector).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.