Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Commercializing Small Farms: Reducing Transaction Costs

Contents:

Author Info

  • Prabhu Pingali

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Yasmeen Khwaja
  • Madelon Meijer

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

Abstract

Broad changes are taking place in agrifood systems worldwide. These changes are driven by economic development, increase in per caput incomes, changing technology and urbanization. Consumers are changing their dietary preferences and shopping habits, resulting in substantial organizational and institutional changes throughout the food marketing chain. Growing concentration at all levels is taking place, particularly in the retail sector, and private sector standards for food quality and safety are proliferating. Increasingly exchange is arranged through the use of contracts. These changes have significant implications for growth, poverty and food security. For the small farmer in particular there are difficulties to meet the standards and contractual requirements. They are faced with a new set of transaction costs that emerge from dealing with a food system characterized by different rules, regulations and players. Increased transactions costs deter entry of small farmers into the market. This paper looks at required interventions aimed at reducing transaction costs to encourage increased farmer participation in competitive markets.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/008/af144e/af144e00.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA) in its series Working Papers with number 05-08.

as in new window
Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0508

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Agricultural Sector in Economic Development Service FAO Viale delle Terme di Caracalla 00153 Rome Italy
Phone: +39(6) 57051
Fax: +39 06 57055522
Email:
Web page: http://www.fao.org/es/esa/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Food systems; Agricultural commercialization; Transaction costs; Small farmers; Policy.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Prabhu L. Pingali, 1997. "From Subsistence to Commercial Production Systems: The Transformation of Asian Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(2), pages 628-634.
  2. Jill E. Hobbs, 1997. "Measuring the Importance of Transaction Costs in Cattle Marketing," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1083-1095.
  3. Ahmed, Zia U., 1989. "Effective costs of rural loans in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 357-363, March.
  4. Rosegrant, Mark W. & Schleyer, Renato Gazmuri & Yadav, Satya N., 1995. "Water policy for efficient agricultural diversification: market-based approaches," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 203-223, June.
  5. Birthal, Pratap S. & Joshi, P. K. & Gulati, Ashok, 2005. "Vertical coordination in high-value commodities," MTID discussion papers 85, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Priya Deshingkar & Usha Kulkarni & Laxman Rao & Sreenivas Rao, 2003. "Changing Food Systems in India: Resourcesharing and Marketing Arrangements for Vegetable Production in Andhra Pradesh," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21(5-6), pages 627-639, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Prabhu Pingali, 2004. "Westernization of Asian Diets and the Transformation of Food Systems: Implications for research and policy," Working Papers 04-17, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  2. Ratner, Blake D. & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Hellin, Jonathon & Mapedza, Everisto & Unruh, Jon D. & Veening, Wouter & Haglund, Eric & May, Candace & Bruch, Carl, 2013. "Addressing conflict through collective action in natural resource management:," CAPRi working papers 112, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Bhattari, Salil & Lyne, Michael & Martin, Sandra, 2013. "Analysing The Performance Of Two Export-Oriented Spice Chains In Nepal: Taking The Smallholder Perspective," 2013 Conference, August 28-30, 2013, Christchurch, New Zealand 160194, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  4. Hellin, Jon & Lundy, Mark & Meijer, Madelon, 2009. "Farmer organization, collective action and market access in Meso-America," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 16-22, February.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0508. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gustavo Anríquez) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Gustavo Anríquez to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.