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Intellectual Property Rights in China: The Changing Political Economy of Chinese-American Interests

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  • Sumner La Croix

    ()
    (Economics Study Area, East-West Center)

  • Denise Eby Konan

    ()
    (Economics, University of Hawaii-Manoa)

Abstract

We review the evolution of modern Chinese intellectual property right (IPR) laws and enforcement and explore economic and political forces involved in international conflicts over Chinese IPR protection. Our analysis considers why the US and China moved from conflict to cooperation over intellectual property rights. Structural and institutional aspects of the political economy of IPRs within each country are considered, and data on Chinese-US trade in intellectual property-intensive goods are examined. We conclude that although enforcement of IPRs within China continues to be relatively weak, Chinese IPR institutions are converging on those in the OECD nations. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by East-West Center, Economics Study Area in its series Economics Study Area Working Papers with number 39.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ewc:wpaper:wp39

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Papageorgiadis, Nikolaos & Cross, Adam R. & Alexiou, Constantinos, 2013. "The impact of the institution of patent protection and enforcement on entry mode strategy: A panel data investigation of U.S. firms," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 278-292.
  2. Keupp, Marcus Matthias & Friesike, Sascha & von Zedtwitz, Maximilian, 2012. "How do foreign firms patent in emerging economies with weak appropriability regimes? Archetypes and motives," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1422-1439.
  3. Chu, Angus C. & Cozzi, Guido & Galli, Silvia, 2013. "Theory and Empirics of Stage-Dependent Intellectual Property Rights," Economics Working Paper Series 1306, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  4. Chu, Angus C. & Cozzi, Guido & Galli, Silvia, 2011. "Innovating like China: a theory of stage-dependent intellectual property rights," MPRA Paper 30553, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Blandine Laperche, 2007. "industrial property rights and innovation in China droits de propriete industrielle et innovation en Chine," Working Papers 140, Laboratoire de Recherche sur l'Industrie et l'Innovation. ULCO / Research Unit on Industry and Innovation.
  6. Ramesh Govindaraj & Gnanaraj Chellaraj, 2002. "The Indian Pharmaceutical Sector : Issues and Options for Health Sector Reform," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15231, October.
  7. Chu, Angus C. & Cozzi, Guido & Galli, Silvia, 2014. "Stage-dependent intellectual property rights," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 239-249.

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