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Consumption, habit formation and precautionary saving: Evidence from the UK

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  • Alessandra Guariglia
  • Mariachristina Rossi

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Essex, Department of Economics in its series Economics Discussion Papers with number 502.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Handle: RePEc:esx:essedp:502

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Web page: http://www.essex.ac.uk/economics/
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Postal: Discussion Papers Administrator, Department of Economics, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ, U.K.
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Cited by:
  1. Myung Hoon Yi & Changkyu Choi, 2006. "A GMM test of the precautionary saving hypothesis with nonexpected-utility preferences," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 71-78.
  2. Sayema H. Bidisha, . "Saving Behaviour of the Immigrants and Ethnic Minorities in the UK: Evidence from Panel Data," Discussion Papers 08/08, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.
  3. Nicola Fuchs-Schuendeln, 2005. "Adjustment to a Large Shock - Do Households Smooth Low Frequency Consumption?," 2005 Meeting Papers 517, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Andreas Schäfer & Simone Valente, 2007. "Habit Formation, Dynastic Altruism, and Population Dynamics," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 07/77, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
  5. Jim Malley & Hassan Molana, 2003. "The Life-Cycle-Permanent- Income Hypothesis: A Reinterpretation and Supporting Evidence," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 138, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  6. Mariacristina Rossi, 2005. "Households' Consumption under the Habit Formation Hypothesis. Evidence from Italian Households using the Survey of Household Income and Wealth (SHIW)," Economics Discussion Papers 595, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  7. Oreste Tristani & Gianni Amisano, 2010. "A nonlinear DSGE model of the term structure with regime shifts," 2010 Meeting Papers 234, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Guariglia, Alessandra & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2004. "Private medical insurance and saving: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 761-783, July.
  9. Clovis Kerdrain & Isabell Koske & Isabelle Wanner, 2011. "Current Account Imbalances: can Structural Reforms Help to Reduce Them?," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2011(1), pages 1-44.
  10. Benjamin Volland, 2013. "Conscientious consumers? Preferences, personality and expenditure in the UK," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-05, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.

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