Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

When Globalization Meets Urbanization: Labor Market Reform, Income Inequality, and Economic Growth in the People’s Republic of China

Contents:

Author Info

  • Ming Lu
  • Hong Gao
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The development path that the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has been following during the past thirty years has led to both internal and external economic imbalances, and is now greatly challenged by the global crisis. This unbalanced growth path was primarily a result of the PRC’s labor market reform which took the years of the mid-1990s as its turning point. Before the mid-1990s, the scale of rural-to-urban migration was limited, but it has grown dramatically since then. 1996 also saw drastic employment restructuring in urban areas of the PRC. [ADBI Working Paper 162]

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document129102010330.1216699.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=3095&fref=repec
    Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 403 Forbidden. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Padma Prakash)
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:3095.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: Oct 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3095

    Note: Institutional Papers
    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.esocialsciences.org

    Related research

    Keywords: development; People’s Republic of China (PRC); internal; economic; global;

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Wan, Guanghua & Lu, Ming & Chen, Zhao, 2006. "The Inequality-Growth Nexus in the Short and Long Runs: Empirical Evidence from China," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) RP2006/92, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Fishman, Arthur & Simhon, Avi, 2002. " The Division of Labor, Inequality and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 117-36, June.
    3. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 1994. "Is Inequality Harmful for Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 600-621, June.
    4. Benjamin, Dwayne & Brandt, Loren & Giles, John T., 2006. "Inequality and Growth in Rural China: Does Higher Inequality Impede Growth?," IZA Discussion Papers 2344, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Li, Hongbin & Zhu, Yi, 2006. "Income, Income Inequality, and Health: Evidence from China," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) DP2006/07, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Shiqing Jiang & Ming Lu & Hiroshi Sato, 2008. "Happiness in the dual society of urban China:Hukou identity, horizontal inequality and heterogeneous reference," LICOS Discussion Papers, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven 22308, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    7. Alesina, Alberto F & Rodrik, Dani, 1991. "Distributive Politics and Economic Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 565, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke, 2001. "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," UCLA Economics Working Papers, UCLA Department of Economics 803, UCLA Department of Economics.
    9. Marcos D. Chamon & Eswar S. Prasad, 2010. "Why Are Saving Rates of Urban Households in China Rising?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 93-130, January.
    10. Benabou, R., 1996. "Inequality and Growth," Working Papers, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University 96-22, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    11. Ravallion, Martin & Shaohua Chen, 2004. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3408, The World Bank.
    12. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52, January.
    13. Philippe Van Kerm, 2004. "What Lies Behind Income Mobility? Reranking and Distributional Change in Belgium, Western Germany and the USA," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(281), pages 223-239, 05.
    14. Yao, Shujie & Zhang, Zongyi & Hanmer, Lucia, 2004. "Growing inequality and poverty in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 145-163.
    15. Yue, Changjun & Hua, Ping, 2002. "Does comparative advantage explains export patterns in China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 276-296.
    16. Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Does aggregation hide the harmful effects of inequality on growth?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 73-77, October.
    17. Yingyi Qian & Barry R. Weingast, 1997. "Federalism as a Commitment to Reserving Market Incentives," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 83-92, Fall.
    18. Li, Hongbin & Zhou, Li-An, 2005. "Political turnover and economic performance: the incentive role of personnel control in China," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 89(9-10), pages 1743-1762, September.
    19. Robert A. Mundell, 1962. "The Appropriate Use of Monetary and Fiscal Policy for Internal and External Stability," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 9(1), pages 70-79, March.
    20. Linxiu Zhang & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2003. "China's War on Poverty: Assessing Targeting and the Growth Impacts of Poverty Programs," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(3), pages 301-317.
    21. Benhabib, Jess & Rustichini, Aldo, 1996. " Social Conflict and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 125-42, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3095. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.