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Educational choice, families and young people's earnings

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  • Ermisch, John
  • Francesconi, Marco

Abstract

This paper presents two optimising models of individual or parental educational choice, and discusses issues of identification and estimates earnings equations in the context of these models. The estimates indicate that education is endogenous for young mens earnings, but not for young women. Identification and estimation relies on family background information from a special sample from the British Household Panel Study 1991-95, which matches mothers and their young adult children.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 97-06.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 1997
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:97-06

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Phone: 44-1206-872957
Fax: 44-1206-873151
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Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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Web: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/

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Cited by:
  1. Salm, Martin & Schunk, Daniel, 2008. "The Role of Childhood Health for the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 3646, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Richard V. Burkhauser & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2000. "Microdata Panel Data and Public Policy: National and Cross-National Perspectives," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 23, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  3. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2010. "Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(1).
  4. Arnaud Chevalier & Gavan Conlon, 2003. "Does it pay to attend a prestigious university?," CEE Discussion Papers 0033, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  5. Chiara Pronzato, 2008. "Why Educated Mothers don’t make Educated Children? A Statistical Study in the Intergenerational Transmission of Schooling," Discussion Papers 563, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  6. Janet Currie, 2009. "Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Socioeconomic Status, Poor Health in Childhood, and Human Capital Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(1), pages 87-122, March.
  7. repec:ese:iserwp:2009-14 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Booth, Alison L & Bryan, Mark L, 2001. "The Union Membership Wage Premium Puzzle: Is There A Free-Rider Problem?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2879, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Massimiliano BRATTI, 2002. "Parents' Current Income, Long-term Characteristics and Children's Education: Evidence from the 1970 British Cohort," Working Papers 174, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  10. V. Del Carpio, Ximena & Macours, Karen, 2009. "Leveling the Intra-household Playing Field: Compensation and Specialization in Child Labor Allocation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4822, The World Bank.
  11. repec:ese:iserwp:2002-23 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova & Olga Rastrigina, 2008. "Ethnic and parental effects on schooling outcomes before and during the transition: evidence from the Baltic countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 719-749, July.
  13. Arnaud Chevalier & Gavan Conlon, 2003. "Does it pay to attend a prestigious university?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19477, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  14. Banerjee, Abhijit V., 2004. "Educational policy and the economics of the family," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 3-32, June.
  15. Massimiliano Bratti & Mendola, M., 2013. "GINI DP 63: Parental Health and Child Schooling!," GINI Discussion Papers 63, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  16. Marco Francesconi & Holly Sutherland & Francesca Zantomio, 2011. "A comparison of earnings measures from longitudinal and cross‐sectional surveys: evidence from the UK," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(2), pages 297-326, 04.

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