Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Seniority, earnings and unions

Contents:

Author Info

  • Booth, Alison L.
  • Frank, Jeff

Abstract

This paper uses a new data source to investigate whether wages rise more with seniority in unionised or nonunionised workplaces. The data distinguish establishments that have incremental wage scales with automatic progression by seniority. For unions with seniority scales, the union wage differential is increasing with seniority. This is not the case for unions without seniority scales. Taking account of this heterogeneity, we are able to recognise previous paradoxical empirical findings. The results provide support for discriminating monopoly models of the trade union and have important efficiency and distributional implications.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 95-16.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 01 Jun 1995
Date of revision:
Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:95-16

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Phone: 44-1206-872957
Fax: 44-1206-873151
Email:
Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Email:
Web: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Sarah Brown & John G. Sessions, . "Education, Earnings, and Fixed-Term Contracts," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 01/5, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  2. Nicholas Lawson, 2011. "Is Collective Bargaining Pareto Efficient? A Survey of the Literature," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 282-304, September.
  3. Paul Hek & Daniel Vuuren, 2011. "Are older workers overpaid? A literature review," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 436-460, August.
  4. Williams, Nicolas, 2009. "Seniority, experience, and wages in the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 272-283, June.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2000-35 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Flabbi, Luca & Ichino, Andrea, 2001. "Productivity, seniority and wages: new evidence from personnel data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 359-387, June.
  7. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F189-F213, June.
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2000-13 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2003. "A sticky floors model of promotion, pay, and gender," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 295-322, April.
  10. Zwick, Thomas, 2011. "Seniority wages and establishment characteristics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 853-861.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:95-16. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Paul Groves).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.