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The nature and causes of attrition in the British Household Panel Study

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  • Uhrig, S.C. Noah

Abstract

Panel attrition is a process producing data absent from panel records due to survey non-participation or other data unavailability. I examine the nature and causes of attrition resulting from non-contact and survey refusal in the British Household Panel Study. Focusing on non-response transitions amongst Wave 1 respondents using discrete time transition models, I locate attrition at first non-response over the first 14 waves. Physical impediments to contact, less time spent at home and high likelihood of geographic mobility are predictive of subsequent non-contact. Refusals most often result from lack of interest in the survey and general low motivation to participate.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2008-05.

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Date of creation: 15 Feb 2008
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2008-05

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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References

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  1. Elizabeth Martin, 2007. "Strength of attachment: Survey coverage of people with tenuous ties to residences," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 427-440, May.
  2. Frauke Kreuter & Richard Valliant, 2007. "A survey on survey statistics: What is done and can be done in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(1), pages 1-21, February.
  3. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-29 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Pamela Campanelli & Colm O'Muircheartaigh, 1999. "Interviewers, Interviewer Continuity, and Panel Survey Nonresponse," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 59-76, February.
  5. Denise Hawkes & Ian Plewis, 2006. "Modelling non-response in the National Child Development Study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(3), pages 479-491.
  6. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 251-299.
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Cited by:
  1. Nicole Watson & Mark Wooden, 2011. "Re-engaging with Survey Non-respondents: The BHPS, SOEP and HILDA Survey Experience," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne wp2011n02, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Martorana, Marco F. & Mazza, Isidoro, 2012. "Adaptive voting: an empirical analysis of participation and choice," MPRA Paper 36165, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Martin Binder & Alex Coad, 2011. ""I'm afraid I have bad news for you . . ." Estimating the impact of different health impairments on subjective well-being," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2011-15, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  4. -, 2008. "Understanding Society. Some preliminary results from the Wave 1 Innovation Panel," Understanding Society Working Paper Series, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research 2008-03, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  5. Aniko Biro;, 2012. "An analysis of mammography decisions with a focus on educational differences," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York 12/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  6. Adrian Chadi, 2014. "Dissatisfied with Life or with Being Interviewed? Happiness and Motivation to Participate in a Survey," IAAEU Discussion Papers, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU) 201403, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
  7. Martorana, Marco Ferdinando & Mazza, Isidoro, 2010. "Satisfaction and adaptation in voting behavior: an empirical exploration," MPRA Paper 29135, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jan 2011.
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-27 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. repec:ese:iserwp:2010-04 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Martin Binder & Alex Coad, 2012. ""I'm afraid I have bad news for you…" Estimating the impact of different health impairments on subjective well-being," SPRU Working Paper Series, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex 200, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
  11. Pia S. Schober, 2011. "Maternal Labor Market Return, Parental Leave Policies, and Gender Inequality in Housework," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 422, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  12. repec:ese:iserwp:2009-30 is not listed on IDEAS

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