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Trying again: repartnering after dissolution of a union

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  • Ermisch, John

Abstract

The paper uses the first 10 waves of the British Household Panel Survey to study the length of cohabiting unions started in the 1990s, and the time it takes to find a new partner for people who dissolved a marriage or cohabiting union in the 1990s. It finds that the time spent living together in cohabiting unions before either marrying each other or the union dissolving is usually very short. Seventy percent of people leaving a cohabiting union find new partners within five years. This compares with the considerably lower figure of 43% for people leaving a marriage. Older people, whether they have been married or cohabiting, typically repartner more slowly. Repartnering also happens more slowly for widows and widowers, and for individuals who have custody of a child (most of whom are women).

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File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/working-papers/iser/2002-19.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2002-19.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2002
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2002-19

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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Cited by:
  1. Stefania Marcassa & Grégory Ponthière, 2010. "Until Death Do Us Part? The economics of short-term marriage contracts," Working Papers halshs-00564900, HAL.
  2. PARISI, Lavinia, 2012. "The Determinants of First and Second Marital Dissolution. Evidence from Britain," CELPE Discussion Papers 121, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.

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