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Job search methods, intensity and success in Britain in the 1990s

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  • Böheim, René
  • Taylor, Mark P.

Abstract

We investigate the use of various job search strategies and their impact on the probability of subsequent employment and the re-employment wage among working age men in Britain. We find that replying to advertisements and using Job Centres are the two most common methods of job search, and that job search intensity, and direct applications to employers in particular, result in a higher probability of subsequent employment. Conditional on finding work, replying to advertisements results in higher paying employment. Age, education, family circumstances and local labour demand, as well as unobserved individual specific effects, emerge as key determinants of job search strategy use and success

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2001-07.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 2001
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2001-07

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Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Tumen, Semih, 2013. "Informal versus Formal Search: Which Yields a Better Pay?," MPRA Paper 50446, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Stephen Wheatley Price & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2004. "Immigrant Job Search in the UK: Evidence from Panel Data," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings, Econometric Society 197, Econometric Society.
  3. Battu, Harminder & Seaman, Paul & Zenou, Yves Zenou, 2010. "Job Contact Networks and the Ethnic Minorities," Research Papers in Economics, Stockholm University, Department of Economics 2010:21, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  4. Fang, Tony & Samnani, Al-Karim & Novicevic, Milorad M. & Bing, Mark N., 2012. "Liability-of-Foreignness Effects on Job Success of Immigrant Job Seekers," IZA Discussion Papers 6742, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Etienne Campens & Solenne Tanguy, 2005. "The market for job placement : a model of head-hunters," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1) v06027, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  6. Blázquez, Maite & Herrarte, Ainhoa & Sáez, Felipe, 2012. "Occupational matching: The case of job seekers inscribed at Public Employment Offices," Working Papers in Economic Theory, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History) 2012/02, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
  7. Weber, Andrea & Mahringer, Helmut, 2006. "Choice and Success of Job Search Methods," IZA Discussion Papers 1939, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Vera A. Adamchik & Josef C. Brada & Arthur E. King, 2009. "Are Transition Economy Workers Underpaid?," Working Papers, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies) 278, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).

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