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Black Populations and Economic Growth: An Extreme Bounds Analysis of Mississippi County-level Data

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  • Matthew J. Higgins
  • Daniel Levy
  • Andrew T. Young

Abstract

We use Mississippi county-level data on (per capita) income and the percentages of populations that are Black (henceforth "Black") to examine the relationship between race and economic growth. The analysis is also conditioned on 40 other economic and sociodemographic variables. Given a negative and statistically significant partial correlation between income growth and Black, we ask if it is robust to exhaustive combinations of other conditioning variables (taken 3 at a time). The evidence suggests yes. Since even robust correlation does not imply causation, we then ask if other robust correlates with income growth play a roll in accounting for Black in the data. The answer "yes" is obtained for only one other robust correlate of the "right" sign: the percentage of a population that is below the poverty level.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta) in its series Emory Economics with number 0701.

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Date of creation: Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:emo:wp2003:0701

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  1. Andrew T. Young & Matthew J. Higgins & Daniel Levy, 2013. "Heterogeneous Convergence," Working Papers 2013-04, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
  2. Young, Andrew & Higgins, Matthew & Levy, Daniel, 2007. "Sigma Convergence versus Beta Convergence: Evidence from U.S. County-Level Data," MPRA Paper 2714, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1991. "A sensitivity analysis of cross-country growth regressions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 609, The World Bank.
  4. Evans, Paul & Karras, Georgios, 1996. "Convergence revisited," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 249-265, April.
  5. Levernier, William & Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 1998. "Differences in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan U.S. Family Income Inequality: A Cross-County Comparison," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 272-290, September.
  6. Connaughton, John E. & Madsen, Ronald A., 2004. "Explaining Per Capita Personal Income Differences between States," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(2), pages 206-220.
  7. Matthew Higgins & Daniel Levy & Andrew Young, 2003. "Growth and Convergence across the U.S.: Evidence from County-level Data," Emory Economics, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta) 0306, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
  8. Edward L. Glaeser & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1995. "Economic Growth in a Cross-Section of Cities," NBER Working Papers 5013, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Edward E. Leamer, 1982. "Let's Take the Con Out of Econometrics," UCLA Economics Working Papers 239, UCLA Department of Economics.
  10. Mihai Nica, 2004. "Convergence in Mississippi: A Spatial Approach," Urban/Regional, EconWPA 0408007, EconWPA.
  11. Paul Evans, 1997. "How Fast Do Economies Converge?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 219-225, May.
  12. Evans, Paul & Karras, Georgios, 1996. "Do Economies Converge? Evidence from a Panel of U.S. States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 384-88, August.
  13. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1990. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Matthew J. Higgins & Daniel Levy & Andrew T. Young, 2006. "Growth and Convergence across the United States: Evidence from County-Level Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 671-681, November.
  15. Evans, Paul, 1996. "Using cross-country variances to evaluate growth theories," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(6-7), pages 1027-1049.
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