Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

What Explains the Effects of Technology Shocks on Labor Market Dynamics?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Zheng Liu
  • Louis Phaneuf

Abstract

The sticky-price theory has proved fairly successful in explaining the dynamic effects of technology shocks on employment, at least under weak accommodation of monetary policy to the shocks. Yet, when we extend the analysis to a broader set of labor market variables, including employment as well as real wages and nominal wages, the sticky-price theory cannot claim victory: it fails to account for the observed wage dynamics following technology shocks unless one is willing to assume implausibly large degrees of monetary policy accommodation and large values of labor supply elasticity. We show that a model that allows for a role of nominal wage rigidity, coupled with a modest degree of price stickiness as some recent research suggests, provides a better account for the macroeconomic effects of technology shocks on the labor market.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://economics.emory.edu/home/assets/workingpapers/liu_04_14_paper.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta) in its series Emory Economics with number 0414.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Oct 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:emo:wp2003:0414

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://economics.emory.edu/home/journals/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Galí, Jordi, 1996. "Technology, Employment, and the Business Cycle: Do Technology Shocks Explain Aggregate Fluctuations?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1499, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Neville Francis & Valerie A. Ramey, 2002. "Is the Technology-Driven Real Business Cycle Hypothesis Dead?," NBER Working Papers 8726, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Susanto Basu & Miles S. Kimball, 1997. "Cyclical Productivity with Unobserved Input Variation," NBER Working Papers 5915, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Blanchard, Olivier Jean, 1989. "A Traditional Interpretation of Macroeconomic Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1146-64, December.
  5. Gali, Jordi, 1992. "How Well Does the IS-LM Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 709-38, May.
  6. Danthine, Jean-Pierre & Kurmann, Andre, 2002. "Fair Wages in a New Keynesian Model of the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 3423, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Gali, Jordi & Lopez-Salido, J. David & Valles, Javier, 2003. "Technology shocks and monetary policy: assessing the Fed's performance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 723-743, May.
  8. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Danny Quah, 1988. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbance," Working papers 497, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  9. Lippi, Marco & Reichlin, Lucrezia, 1993. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 644-52, June.
  10. Mark Bils & Peter J. Klenow, 2002. "Some Evidence on the Importance of Sticky Prices," NBER Working Papers 9069, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Michael Dotsey, 1999. "Structure from shocks," Working Paper 99-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  12. Jordi Galí & Pau Rabanal, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations," IMF Working Papers 04/234, International Monetary Fund.
  13. K. Huang & Z. Liu, . "Staggered price-setting, staggered wage-setting, and business cycle persistence," Working Papers 2000-28, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  14. Griffin, Peter, 1992. "The Impact of Affirmative Action on Labor Demand: A Test of Some Implications of the Le Chatelier Principle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 251-60, May.
  15. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald, 1996. "Returns to scale in U.S. production: estimates and implications," International Finance Discussion Papers 546, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  16. Gamber, Edward N & Joutz, Frederick L, 1993. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1387-93, December.
  17. Lindé, Jesper, 2004. "The Effects of Permanent Technology Shocks on Labor Productivity and Hours in the RBC model," Working Paper Series 161, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  18. Alexopoulos, Michelle, 2004. "Unemployment and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 277-298, March.
  19. Susanto Basu, 1998. "Technology and business cycles; how well do standard models explain the facts?," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 42(Jun), pages 207-269.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Ossama Mikhail, 2005. "What Happens After A Technology Shock? A Bayesian Perspective," Macroeconomics 0510016, EconWPA.
  2. Marianna Riggi & Massimiliano Tancioni, 2008. "Nominal v. Real Wage Rigidities in New Keynesian Models with Hiring Costs," Working Papers 107, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
  3. Marianna Riggi, 2007. "New Keynesian models with labor market rigidities: a critical survey," Working Papers 102, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:emo:wp2003:0414. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sue Mialon).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.