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The cyclicality of the separation and job finding rates in France

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  • Jean-Olivier Hairault
  • Thomas Le Barbanchon
  • Thepthida Sopraseuth

    ()
    (PSE, University of Paris I
    Crest
    THEMA, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise)

Abstract

In this paper, we aim to shed light on the relative contribution of the separation and job finding rates to French unemployment at business cycle frequencies by using administrative data on registered unemployment and labor force surveys. We first investigate the fluctuations in steady state unemployment, and then in current unemployment in order to take into account the unemployment deviations from equilibrium. Our results show the dominant role of the job finding rate in accounting for French unemployment fluctuations. The contribution of the job finding rate amounts to about two-thirds of the unemployment dynamics. With the two data sets, we find that both rates contributed to unemployment fluctuations during the nineties, while the job finding rate has been more significant in the last decade. In particular, the last business cycle episodes, including the last recession, exacerbate the role of the job finding rate.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise in its series THEMA Working Papers with number 2013-07.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2013-07

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Keywords: unemployment variability; job separation; job finding; worker flows;

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References

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  1. Michael Elsby & Bart Hobijn & Aysegul Sahin, 2008. "Unemployment Dynamics in the OECD," NBER Working Papers 14617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Smith, Jennifer, 2010. "The Ins and Outs of UK Unemployment," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 944, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Tomi Kyyrä & Ralf A. Wilke, 2011. "On the reliability of retrospective unemployment information in European household panel data," Working Papers 21, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  4. Michael W. Elsby & Ryan Michaels & Gary Solon, 2007. "The Ins and Outs of Cyclical Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 12853, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Robert Shimer, 2012. "Reassessing the Ins and Outs of Unemployment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 127-148, April.
  6. Thierry Magnac & Michael Visser, 1999. "Transition Models With Measurement Errors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 466-474, August.
  7. Barbara Petrongolo & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2008. "The Ins and Outs of European Unemployment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0853, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Pedro Portugal & Olivier Blanchard, 2001. "What Hides Behind an Unemployment Rate: Comparing Portuguese and U.S. Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 187-207, March.
  9. Poterba, James M & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "Reporting Errors and Labor Market Dynamics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(6), pages 1319-38, November.
  10. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2007. "The cyclicality of separation and job finding rates," Working Papers 07-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Why is it so difficult to find a job in France?
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-04-12 13:26:00
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Cited by:
  1. Hertweck, Matthias Sebastian & Sigrist, Oliver, 2013. "The Aggregate Effects of the Hartz Reforms in Germany," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79942, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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