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Social savings as a measure of the contribution of a new technology to economic growth

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  • Nicholas Crafts

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/22554/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History in its series Economic History Working Papers with number 22554.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:22554

Contact details of provider:
Postal: LSE, Dept. of Economic History Houghton Street London, WC2A 2AE, U.K.
Phone: +44 (0) 20 7955 7084
Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/
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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Metzer, Jacob, 1984. "Railroads and the Efficiency of Internal Markets: Some Conceptual and Practical Considerations," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 61-70, October.
  2. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2000. "The Resurgence of Growth in the Late 1990s: Is Information Technology the Story?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 3-22, Fall.
  3. Paul A. David & Gavin Wright, 1999. "Early Twentieth Century Productivity Growth Dynamics: An Inquiry into the Economic History of "Our Ignorance"," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _033, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  4. Tamim Bayoumi & Markus Haacker, 2002. "It's Not What You Make, It's How You Use IT: Measuring the Welfare Benefits of the IT Revolution Across Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/117, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Bresnahan, Timothy F, 1986. "Measuring the Spillovers from Technical Advance: Mainframe Computers inFinancial Services," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 742-55, September.
  6. Herranz-Lonc N, Alfonso, 2004. "Infrastructure and Economic Growth in Spain, 1845 1935," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 64(02), pages 540-545, June.
  7. Peter D. McClelland, 1972. "Social Rates of Return on American Railroads in the Nineteenth Century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 25(3), pages 471-488, 08.
  8. Nicholas Crafts, 2003. "Is Economic Growth Good For Us?," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 4(3), pages 35-49, July.
  9. Fogel, Robert William, 1979. "Notes on the Social Saving Controversy," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(01), pages 1-54, March.
  10. Hulten, Charles R, 1978. "Growth Accounting with Intermediate Inputs," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(3), pages 511-18, October.
  11. C. Knick Harley, 1999. "Cotton textile prices revisited: a response to Cuenca Esteban," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 52(4), pages 756-765, November.
  12. Metzer, Jacob, 1973. "Some Economic Aspects of Railroad Development in Tsarist Russia," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(01), pages 314-316, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Jalava, Jukka & Pohjola, Matti, 2008. "The roles of electricity and ICT in economic growth: Case Finland," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 270-287, July.
  2. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Spinning Welfare: the Gains from Process Innovation in Cotton and Car Production," CEP Discussion Papers dp1050, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Robert W. Fogel, 2009. "The Impact of the Asian Miracle on the Theory of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 14967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Catherine Mann, 2011. "Information Technology, Globalization, and Growth: Role for Scale Economies, Terms of Trade, and Variety," Working Papers 27, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.

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