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Multiple Job Holding in Russia During Economic Transition

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  • Mark C. Foley
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    Abstract

    This article analyzes multiple job holding in the context of economic transition. Evidence from a nationally representative longitudinal survey of Russian citizens is used to characterize secondary jobs and second job holders, with emphasis on the determinants of multiple job holding. There has been a marked increase in multiple job holding, rising from 5.6 percent overall in 1992 to 10.1 percent in 1996. Economic conditions prevalent in Russia's labor market are found to strongly affect secondary job activity. Workers who have experienced wage arrears, been placed on involuntary leave, or are working less than full-time are all significantly more likely to take on second jobs. Higher education nearly doubles this probability. As transition has progressed, women have become not only much less likely to engage in additional work, but those that do so receive significantly lower second-job wages, with a gender wage gap of 68 percent, over 3 times that for primary jobs. Marriage and young children are associated with lower multiple job holding rates for women.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp781.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Economic Growth Center, Yale University in its series Working Papers with number 781.

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    Length: 42 pages
    Date of creation: Aug 1997
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:781

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    Keywords: Multiple Job Holding; Economic Transition; Russia;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence Kahn, 1995. "The Gender Earnings Gap: Some International Evidence," NBER Chapters, in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 105-144 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Christina H. Paxson & Nachum Sicherman, 1994. "The Dynamics of Dual-Job Holding and Job Mobility," NBER Working Papers 4968, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Shishko, Robert & Rostker, Bernard, 1976. "The Economics of Multiple Job Holding," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(3), pages 298-308, June.
    4. Unni, J., 1992. "Occupational Choice and Multiple Job Holding in Rural Gujarat, India," Papers 677, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
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    Cited by:
    1. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Acquisti, Alessandro, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Job Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 595-617, December.
    2. RENNA Francesco & OAXACA Ronald L. & CHOE Chung, 2013. "Constrained vs Unconstrained Labor Supply: The Economics of Dual Job Holding," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2013-03, CEPS/INSTEAD.
    3. Stephen Deloach & Annie Hoffman, 2002. "Russia's second shift: Is housework hurting women's wages?," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 30(4), pages 422-432, December.
    4. Ekaterina Kalugina & Catherine Sofer & Natalia Radtchenko, 2009. "Intra-household inequality in transitional Russia," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 447-471, December.
    5. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Acquisti, Alessandro, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," IZA Discussion Papers 65, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Guariglia, Alessandra & Kim, Byung-Yeon, 2001. "The Dynamics of Moonlighting: What is happening in the Russian informal economy?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 5/2001, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    7. Irina Merkuryeva, 2006. "Informal Employment in Russia: Combining Disadvantages and Opportunities," CERT Discussion Papers 0606, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.

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