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Subjective Reasoning--Games with Unawareness

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  • Feinberg, Yossi

    (Stanford U)

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    Abstract

    The subjective framework for reasoning is extended to incorporate the representation of unawareness in games. Both unawareness of actions and decision makers are modeled as well as reasoning about others' unawareness. It is shown that a small grain of uncertainty about unawareness with rational decision makers can lead to cooperation in the finitely repeated prisoner's dilemma.

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    File URL: http://gsbapps.stanford.edu/researchpapers/detail1.asp?Document_ID=2584
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Stanford University, Graduate School of Business in its series Research Papers with number 1875.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2004
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    Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:1875

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    Cited by:
    1. Aviad Heifetz & Martin Meier & Burkhard Schipper, 2011. "Dynamic unawareness and rationalizable behavior," Working Papers 113, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    2. Burkhard C. Schipper & Martin Meier & Aviad Heifetz, 2005. "A Canonical Model for Interactive Unawareness," Working Papers 57, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    3. Kim-Sau Chung & Oliver Board, 2007. "Object-Based Unawareness," Working Papers 2007-2, University of Minnesota, Department of Economics, revised 24 Aug 2007.
    4. Galanis, Spyros, 2013. "Trade and the value of information under unawareness," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 1313, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    5. Feinberg, Yossi, 2005. "Games with Incomplete Awareness," Research Papers 1894, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    6. Gossner Olivier & Tsakas Elias, 2010. "A reasoning approach to introspection and unawareness," Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    7. Yi-Chun Chen & Jeffrey Ely & Xiao Luo, 2012. "Note on unawareness: Negative Introspection versus AU Introspection (and KU Introspection)," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 325-329, May.
    8. Feinberg, Yossi, 2012. "Games with Unawareness," Research Papers 2122, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    9. Mengel, Friederike & Tsakas, Elias & Vostroknutov Alexander, 2009. "Awareness in Repeated Games," Research Memorandum 010, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).

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