Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Mobility, poverty and well-being among the informally employed in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Contents:

Author Info

  • Gorana Krstic

    (Economics Institute, Belgrade)

  • Peter Sanfey

    ()
    (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development)

Abstract

We analyse informal-sector employment in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), using panel data from the Living Standards Measurement Studies. We derive four main conclusions. First, there is significant labour market mobility in BH, with education being an important factor in explaining movements from informal- to formal-sector jobs. Secondly, those in informal jobs are much more likely to suffer from poverty than formally employed people. Thirdly, earnings inequality is more pronounced in the informal sector than elsewhere. Fourthly, the informally employed report lower levels of life satisfaction compared with those in almost all other groups in the labour market. Overall, we conclude that, while the informal sector may represent a vital coping strategy for many, the formal sector provides much better prospects for prosperity and well-being.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.ebrd.com/downloads/research/economics/workingpapers/wp0101.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist in its series Working Papers with number 101.

as in new window
Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in G. Krstic and P. Sanfey (2007), Economic Systems, 31(3), pp. 311-335.
Handle: RePEc:ebd:wpaper:101

Contact details of provider:
Postal: One Exchange Square, London EC2A 2JN
Web page: http://www.ebrd.com/pages/research/publications/workingpapers.shtml
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Informal sector; poverty; mobility; happiness; Bosnia and Herzegovina;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Edward Christie & Mario Holzner, 2004. "Household Tax Compliance and the Shadow Economy in Central and Southeastern Europe," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 038, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  2. Rutkowski, Jan, 2003. "Rapid labor reallocation with a stagnant unemployment pool : the puzzle of the labor market in Lithuania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2946, The World Bank.
  3. Rutkowski, Jan, 2003. "Why is unemployment so high in Bulgaria?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3017, The World Bank.
  4. Peter Sanfey & Utku Teksoz, 2007. "Does transition make you happy?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 707-731, October.
  5. World Bank, 2002. "Labor Market in Postwar Bosnia and Herzegovina : How to Encourage Businesses to Create Jobs and Increase Worker Mobility," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15333, The World Bank.
  6. World Bank, 2005. "Bosnia and Herzegovina : Country Economic Memorandum," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8676, The World Bank.
  7. Rosser, J. Jr. & Rosser, Marina V. & Ahmed, Ehsan, 2000. "Income Inequality and the Informal Economy in Transition Economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 156-171, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Tansel, Aysit & Kan, Elif Oznur, 2012. "Labor Mobility across the Formal/Informal Divide in Turkey: Evidence from Individual Level Data," IZA Discussion Papers 6271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Christoph Eder, 2013. "Displacement and Education of the Next Generation: Evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina," HiCN Working Papers 152, Households in Conflict Network.
  3. Aistov, Andrey & Larin, Alexander & Leonova, Lyudmila, 2012. "Informal employment and happiness: Model with endogenous regressors," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 26(2), pages 17-36.
  4. Lehmann, Hartmut & Razzolini, Tiziano & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2011. "Job Separations and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6230, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Quintano, Claudio & Mazzocchi, Paolo, 2013. "The shadow economy beyond European public governance," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 650-670.
  6. Anna Lukiyanova, 2013. "Earnings inequality and informal Employment in Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 37/EC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  7. Peter Sanfey & Gorana Krstic, 2010. "Earnings inequality and the informal economy: evidence from Serbia," Working Papers 114, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist.
  8. Hartmut Lehmannan & Tiziano Razzolini & Anzelika Zaiceva, 2012. "Job separations, job loss and informality in the Russian labor marke," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 076, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics.
  9. Aristei, David & Perugini, Cristiano, 2012. "Inequality and reforms in transition countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 2-10.
  10. Lukiyanova, Anna, 2013. "The impact of informality on earnings inequality: Unconditional quantile regressions," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 32(4), pages 3-28.
  11. Alicia Puyana & Jose Romero, 2012. "Informalidad y dualismo en la economía mexicana," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2012-11, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebd:wpaper:101. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Olga Lucas).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.