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Informal Values and Formal Policies - A study of Japanese Technology Policy and Significance for India

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  • Saradindu Bhaduri

    (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations)

  • Janashruti Chandra
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    Abstract

    The main objective of this paper is to analyse some aspects of Japanese policy in the post World War-II period and understand how the various informal institutions (shared mental models) have influenced key dimensions of technology strategy with regard to the nature and trajectory of activities it sought to promote. Previous studies have mainly focused on industrial policy on the basis of the White Papers published by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Our study, in contrast, focuses exclusively on technology policies by examining the White Papers on Science and Technology (Kagakugijutsu Hakusho) published by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). We then endeavour to understand the significance of our findings for policy making in India. However, the limited scope of this undertaking makes our results indicative in nature.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by East Asian Bureau of Economic Research in its series Development Economics Working Papers with number 22144.

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    Date of creation: Jan 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22144

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    Related research

    Keywords: Informal values; institutions; culture; norm; technology; MITI;

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    1. Gittelman, Michelle, 2006. "National institutions, public-private knowledge flows, and innovation performance: A comparative study of the biotechnology industry in the US and France," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1052-1068, September.
    2. Rosenberg, Nathan & Steinmueller, W Edward, 1988. "Why Are Americans Such Poor Imitators?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 229-34, May.
    3. Arthur T. Denzau & Douglass C. North, 1993. "Shared Mental Models: Ideologies and Institutions," Economic History 9309003, EconWPA.
    4. Fransman, Martin, 1995. "Is National Technology Policy Obsolete in a Globalised World? The Japanese Response," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 95-119, February.
    5. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 2002. "Participation and Development: Perspectives from the Comprehensive Development Paradigm," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(2), pages 163-82, June.
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