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Modélisation non-linéaire de l'impact des TIC sur la productivité du travail

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  • Benjamin David
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    Abstract

    This paper focuses on dynamic of diffusion of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and their impact on labor productivity. Our contribution lies in taking into account the non-linearity of this relationship arguing successively integration time and a time when new productivity gains appear. The existence of this particular sequence is modeled using a Logistic Smooth Transition model (LSTR) which permits to verify the delayed effect assumed for nine of the twelve countries studied. Different values of the adjustment periods across them are related to the structural characteristics of economies considered.

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    File URL: http://economix.fr/pdf/dt/2012/WP_EcoX_2012-51.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX in its series EconomiX Working Papers with number 2012-51.

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    Length: 32 pages
    Date of creation: 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2012-51

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    Related research

    Keywords: ICT; Solow Paradox; Labor productivity; Delayed effect; LSTR model;

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    1. Giuseppe Nicoletti & Stefano Scarpetta & Olivier Boylaud, 2000. "Summary Indicators of Product Market Regulation with an Extension to Employment Protection Legislation," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 226, OECD Publishing.
    2. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: US Economic Growth in the Information Age," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 261, OECD Publishing.
    3. Il Houng Lee & Yougesh Khatri, 2003. "Information Technology and Productivity Growth in Asia," IMF Working Papers 03/15, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Paul Osterman, 1986. "The impact of computers on the employment of clerks and managers," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(2), pages 175-186, January.
    5. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
    6. Gustavo Crespi & Chiara Criscuolo & Jonathan Haskel, 2007. "Information technology, organisational change and productivity growth: evidence from UK firms," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19748, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2003. "Computing Productivity: Firm-Level Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 793-808, November.
    8. Takahito Kanamori & Kazuyuki Motohashi, 2006. "Centralization or Decentralization of Decision Rights? Impact on IT Performance of Firms," Discussion papers 06032, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    9. Mirko Draca & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Productivity and ICT: a review of the evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4561, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Timmer, Marcel P. & Ypma, Gerard & Ark, Bart van der, 2003. "IT in the European Union: driving productivity divergence?," GGDC Research Memorandum 200363, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
    11. Gordon, Robert J, 2002. "Technology and Economic Performance in the American Economy," CEPR Discussion Papers 3213, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 1994. "Computers and Output Growth Revisited: How Big Is the Puzzle?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(2), pages 273-334.
    13. David, P.A., 1989. "Computer And Dynamo: The Modern Productivity Paradox In A Not-Too Distant Mirror," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 339, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
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