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Innovative work practices, information technologies and working conditions: evidence for France

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  • Philippe Askenazy
  • Eve Caroli

Abstract

We investigate the impact of new work practices and information and communication technologies (ICT) on working conditions in France. We use a unique French dataset providing information on individual workers for the year 1998. New work practices include the use of quality norms, job rotation, collective discussions on work organization and working time flexibility. Working conditions are captured by occupational injuries as well as indicators of mental strain. We find that workers involved in the new practices face working conditions that are significantly worse than those of workers in non innovative work practices. But, the picture is mixed for ICT that seem to make the workplace safer and less risky.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX in its series EconomiX Working Papers with number 2006-2.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2006-2

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Keywords: New work practices; technology; working conditions; occupational injuries.;

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References

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  1. S. Black & L. Lynch, 1997. "How to compete: the impact of workplace practices and information technology on productivity," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 20298, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Ichniowski, Casey & Shaw, Kathryn & Prennushi, Giovanna, 1997. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity: A Study of Steel Finishing Lines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 291-313, June.
  3. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2000. "What's Driving the New Economy: The Benefits of Workplace Innovation," NBER Working Papers 7479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Eve Caroli & John Van Reenen, 2001. "Skill-Biased Organizational Change? Evidence From A Panel Of British And French Establishments," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1449-1492, November.
  5. Rajeev H. Dehejia & Sadek Wahba, 2002. "Propensity score matching methods for non-experimental causal studies," Discussion Papers, Columbia University, Department of Economics 0102-14, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  6. David Fairris & Mark Brenner, 2001. "Workplace Transformation and the Rise in Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Is There a Connection?," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(1), pages 15-28, January.
  7. Paul Osterman, 2000. "Work reorganization in an era of restructuring: Trends in diffusion and effects on employee welfare," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(2), pages 179-196, January.
  8. Paul Osterman, 1994. "How common is workplace transformation and who adopts it?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(2), pages 173-188, January.
  9. Keisuke Hirano & Guido W. Imbens & Geert Ridder, 2003. "Efficient Estimation of Average Treatment Effects Using the Estimated Propensity Score," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1161-1189, 07.
  10. Kochan, Thomas A., 1996. "What works at work : overview and assessment," Working papers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management 3886-96., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  11. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, And The Demand For Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376, February.
  12. Francis Green, 2002. "Why Has Work Effort Become More Intense?," Studies in Economics, Department of Economics, University of Kent 0207, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
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Cited by:
  1. Annalisa Cristini & Alessandro Gaj & Riccardo Leoni, 2008. "Direct and Indirect Complementarity between Workplace Reorganization and New Technology," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(2), pages 87-117, March-Apr.
  2. Böckerman, Petri & Johansson, Edvard & Kauhanen, Antti, 2009. "Innovative Work Practices and Sickness Absence: What Does a Nationally Representative Employee Survey Tell?," Discussion Papers, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy 1199, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  3. Thomas Barnay, 2014. "Health, Work and Working Conditions: A Review of the European Economic Literature," Post-Print, HAL hal-01044972, HAL.
  4. Joseph Lanfranchi & Sanja Pekovic, 2012. "How Green is my Firm? Workers' Attitudes towards Job, Job Involvement and Effort in Environmentally-Related Firms," Working Papers halshs-00744483, HAL.
  5. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
  6. Raouf Boucekkine & Patricia Criffo & Claudio Mattalia, 2008. "Technological progress, organizational change and the size of the Human Resources Department," Working Papers, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow 2008_20, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  7. Nicole Nestoriak & John Ruser, 2010. "Emerging Labor Market Trends and Workplace Safety and Health," NBER Chapters, in: Labor in the New Economy, pages 425-453 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Michael Beckmann & Thomas Cornelissen, 2014. "Self-Managed Working Time and Employee Effort: Microeconometric Evidence," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 636, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  9. Michael Beckmann & Thomas Cornelissen & Bern Schauenberg, 2009. "Fixed-term employment, work organization and job satisfaction: Evidence from German individual-level data," Working papers, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel 2009/09, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  10. Martin, Ludivine, 2007. "The impact of technological changes on incentives and motivations to work hard," IRISS Working Paper Series, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD 2007-15, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.

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