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Decreasing Marginal Impatience in a Monetary Growth Model

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  • Ken-Ichi Hirose
  • Shinsuke Ikeda

Abstract

Unlike the standard assumption that the degree of impatience, measured by the rate of time preference, is increasing in wealth, empirical studies support that impatience ismarginally decreasing. By introducing decreasing marginal impatience into the neoclassical monetary growth model _ la Sidrauski, we show that (i) consistently with empirical results, an increase in the core rate of inflation reduces capital stocks in a steady state; and that (ii) its long-run welfare cost is larger than predicted with increasing or constant marginal impatience, implying that estimates of the inflation cost which have so far been obtained by assuming constant time preference may be underestimates.

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Paper provided by Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University in its series ISER Discussion Paper with number 0622.

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Date of creation: Nov 2004
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Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0622

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  1. Epstein, Larry G., 1987. "A simple dynamic general equilibrium model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 68-95, February.
  2. Gootzeit, Michael & Schneider, Johannes & Smith, William, 2002. "Marshallian recursive preferences and growth," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 381-404, November.
  3. Das, Mausumi, 2003. "Optimal growth with decreasing marginal impatience," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(10), pages 1881-1898, August.
  4. Jones, Larry E. & Manuelli, Rodolfo E., 1995. "Growth and the effects of inflation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(8), pages 1405-1428, November.
  5. Becker, Gary S & Mulligan, Casey B, 1997. "The Endogenous Determination of Time Preference," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 729-58, August.
  6. Weil, Philippe, 1991. "Is Money Net Wealth?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(1), pages 37-53, February.
  7. Andrew A. Samwick, 1997. "Discount Rate Heterogeneity and Social Security Reform," NBER Working Papers 6219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Shi, Shouyong, 1994. "Weakly Nonseparable Preferences and Distortionary Taxes in a Small Open Economy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 35(2), pages 411-28, May.
  9. Heijdra, Ben J, 1998. "Fiscal Policy Multipliers: The Role of Monopolistic Competition, Scale Economies, and Intertemporal Substitution in Labour Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 659-96, August.
  10. Lawrance, Emily C, 1991. "Poverty and the Rate of Time Preference: Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 54-77, February.
  11. Stockman, Alan C., 1981. "Anticipated inflation and the capital stock in a cash in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 387-393.
  12. Barsky, Robert B, et al, 1997. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(2), pages 537-79, May.
  13. Robert E. Lucas, Jr., 2000. "Inflation and Welfare," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 247-274, March.
  14. Epstein, Larry G & Hynes, J Allan, 1983. "The Rate of Time Preference and Dynamic Economic Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 611-35, August.
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