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The crisis as a wake-up call. Do banks tighten screening and monitoring during a financial crisis?

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  • Ralph de Haas
  • Neeltje van Horen

Abstract

To what extent was the credit contraction during the global financial crisis due to more intense screening and monitoring by banks? We address this question by analyzing changes in the structure of a large number of syndicated loans to private, non-financial corporations. We find an increase in retention rates among syndicate arrangers during the crisis that we cannot explain by borrower risk or interbank liquidity alone. This increased 'skin in the game' is especially pronounced when information asymmetries between the borrower and the lending syndicate - or within the syndicate - are high. This indicates that the reduction in bank lending during the crisis was at least partly caused by stricter bank screening and monitoring: a wake-up call.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department in its series DNB Working Papers with number 255.

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Date of creation: Jul 2010
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:255

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Keywords: bank lending; financial crisis; loan retention; screening and monitoring; syndication;

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References

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  1. Ralph De Haas & Iman Van Lelyveld, 2008. "Internal capital markets and lending by multinational bank subsidiaries," Working Papers 105, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist.
  2. Giovanni Dell’Ariccia & Deniz Igan & Luc Laeven, 2012. "Credit Booms and Lending Standards: Evidence from the Subprime Mortgage Market," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 367-384, 03.
  3. Rajan, Raghuram G, 1994. "Why Bank Credit Policies Fluctuate: A Theory and Some Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 399-441, May.
  4. Amir Sufi, 2007. "Information Asymmetry and Financing Arrangements: Evidence from Syndicated Loans," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(2), pages 629-668, 04.
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  7. Diamond, Douglas W, 1984. "Financial Intermediation and Delegated Monitoring," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 393-414, July.
  8. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Detragiache, Enrica & Gupta, Poonam, 2000. "Inside the crisis : an empirical analysis of banking systems in distress," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2431, The World Bank.
  9. Iftekhar Hasan & Anthony Saunders & Viral V. Acharya, 2002. "Should banks be diversified? Evidence from individual bank loan portfolios," BIS Working Papers 118, Bank for International Settlements.
  10. Katerina Simons, 1993. "Why do banks syndicate loans?," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 45-52.
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  12. Allen N. Berger & Gregory F. Udell, 2003. "The institutional memory hypothesis and the procyclicality of bank lending behavior," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-02, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  14. Broecker, Thorsten, 1990. "Credit-Worthiness Tests and Interbank Competition," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(2), pages 429-52, March.
  15. Boot, Arnoud W. A., 2000. "Relationship Banking: What Do We Know?," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 7-25, January.
  16. Christophe J. Godlewski, 2008. "What Drives the Arrangement Timetable of Bank Loan Syndication ?," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2008-02, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.
  17. Steven Ongena, 1999. "Lending Relationships, Bank Default and Economic Activity," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 257-280.
  18. Dennis, Steven A. & Mullineaux, Donald J., 2000. "Syndicated Loans," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 404-426, October.
  19. Diamond, Douglas W, 1991. "Monitoring and Reputation: The Choice between Bank Loans and Directly Placed Debt," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 689-721, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Godlewski, Christophe J., 2014. "Bank loans and borrower value during the global financial crisis: Empirical evidence from France," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 100-130.
  2. Berg, Gunhild & Kirschenmann, Karolin, 2012. "Funding vs. real economy shock : the impact of the 2007-2009 crisis on small firms'credit availability," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6030, The World Bank.
  3. Blaise Gadanecz & Alper Kara & Philip Molyneux, 2011. "The value of repeat lending," BIS Working Papers 350, Bank for International Settlements.
  4. Ralph de Haas & Neeltje van Horen, 2011. "Running for the Exit: International Banks and Crisis Transmission," DNB Working Papers 279, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  5. Marcello Pagnini & Silvia Del Prete & Paola Rossi & Valerio Vacca, 2013. "Lending Organization and Credit Supply During the Crisis," ERSA conference papers ersa13p673, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Christophe Godlewski, 2012. "Are bank loans still “special” (especially during a crisis)? Empirical evidence from a European country," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2012-03, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.

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