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The impact of survey design on research outcomes: A case study of seven pilots measuring cash usage in the Netherlands

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Author Info

  • Nicole Jonker
  • Anneke Kosse

Abstract

We employ a unique dataset of transaction records to analyse whether results of consumer surveys are influenced by the survey setup. We have asked more than 5,000 consumers to report their payments using seven different data collection methods. The results of the seven pilot studies were validated against actual payments data from retailers and the owner of the Dutch debit card scheme. The results of both the validation exercise and econometric analyses reveal that both the data collection mode and the length of the registration period significantly influence consumers' registration of payments. Measurement errors are minimised when consumers are asked to use a self-reported transaction diary for one single day.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department in its series DNB Working Papers with number 221.

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Date of creation: Aug 2009
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Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:221

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Postal: Postbus 98, 1000 AB Amsterdam
Web page: http://www.dnb.nl/en/
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Related research

Keywords: cash; efficiency; payment behaviour; survey design; measurement error;

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Cited by:
  1. Kosse, Anneke, 2011. "Do newspaper articles on card fraud affect debit card usage?," Working Paper Series 1389, European Central Bank.
  2. Michael Cohen & Marc Rysman, 2012. "Payment choice with consumer panel data," Working Papers 13, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
  3. Arango, Carlos & Huynh, Kim P. & Sabetti, Leonard, 2011. "How do you pay? The role of incentives at the point-of-sale," Working Paper Series 1386, European Central Bank.
  4. Jonker Nicole, 2011. "Card Acceptance and Surcharging: the Role of Costs and Competition," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-35, June.
  5. Anneke Kosse & David-Jan Jansen, 2011. "Choosing how to pay: the influence of home country habits," DNB Working Papers 328, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

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