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Meta-Regression Approximations to Reduce Publication Selection Bias

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  • T.D. Stanley

    ()

  • Hristos Doucouliagos

    ()

Abstract

Publication selection bias represents a serious challenge to the integrity of all empirical sciences. We develop meta-regression approximations that are shown to reduce this bias and outperform conventional meta-analytic methods. Our approach is derived from Taylor polynomial approximations to the conditional mean of a truncated distribution. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate how a new hybrid estimator provides a practical solution. These meta-regression methods are applied to several policy-relevant areas of research including: antidepressant effectiveness, the value of a statistical life and the employment effect of minimum wages and alter what we think we know.

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File URL: http://www.deakin.edu.au/buslaw/aef/workingpapers/papers/2011_4.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance in its series Economics Series with number 2011_4.

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Date of creation: 25 May 2011
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Handle: RePEc:dkn:econwp:eco_2011_4

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Keywords: meta-regression; publication selection bias; systematic reviews; truncation;

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References

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  1. T.D. Stanley & Stephen B. Jarrell & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2009. "Could It Be Better to Discard 90% of the Data? A Statistical Paradox," Economics Series 2009_13, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  2. Joan Costa‐Font & Marin Gemmill & Gloria Rubert, 2011. "Biases in the healthcare luxury good hypothesis?: a meta‐regression analysis," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(1), pages 95-107, January.
  3. T. D. Stanley, 2001. "Wheat from Chaff: Meta-analysis as Quantitative Literature Review," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 131-150, Summer.
  4. T. D. Stanley, 2008. "Meta-Regression Methods for Detecting and Estimating Empirical Effects in the Presence of Publication Selection," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(1), pages 103-127, 02.
  5. T.D Stanley & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2007. "Identifying and Correcting Publication Selection Bias in the Efficiency-Wage Literature: Heckman Meta-Regression," Economics Series 2007_11, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  6. Bellavance, Franois & Dionne, Georges & Lebeau, Martin, 2009. "The value of a statistical life: A meta-analysis with a mixed effects regression model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 444-464, March.
  7. Mandel, Micha & Rinott, Yosef, 2009. "A Selection Bias Conflict and Frequentist versus Bayesian Viewpoints," The American Statistician, American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 63(3), pages 211-217.
  8. T. D. Stanley & Stephen B. Jarrell, 2005. "Meta-Regression Analysis: A Quantitative Method of Literature Surveys," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 299-308, 07.
  9. Havranek, Tomas, 2009. "Rose Effect and the Euro: Is the Magic Gone?," MPRA Paper 18479, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Nov 2009.
  10. T.D. Stanley & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2010. "Picture This: A Simple Graph That Reveals Much Ado About Research," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 170-191, 02.
  11. Viscusi, W Kip, 1993. "The Value of Risks to Life and Health," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 1912-46, December.
  12. J. Bradford De Long & Kevin Lang, . "Are All Economic Hypotheses False?," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _117, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
  13. Feld, Lars P. & Heckemeyer, Jost Henrich, 2008. "FDI and Taxation: A Meta-Study," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-128, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  14. Bowland, Brad J. & Beghin, John C., 2001. "Robust Estimates of Value of a Statistical Life for Developing Economies," Staff General Research Papers 5196, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  15. Hristos Doucouliagos & T.D. Stanley, 2008. "Publication Selection Bias in Minimum-Wage Research? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Economics Series 2008_14, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  16. Eric Krassoi Peach & T. Stanley, 2009. "Efficiency Wages, Productivity and Simultaneity: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 262-268, September.
  17. T. D. Stanley, 2005. "Beyond Publication Bias," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 309-345, 07.
  18. Marin C. Gemmill & Joan Costa-Font & Alistair McGuire, 2007. "In search of a corrected prescription drug Elasticity estimate: a meta-regression approach," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(6), pages 627-643.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Chris Doucouliagos & T.D. Stanley, 2013. "Are All Economic Facts Greatly Exaggerated? Theory Competition And Selectivity," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(2), pages 316-339, 04.
  2. Stephan B. Bruns & Christian Gross & David I. Stern, 2013. "Is There Really Granger Causality Between Energy Use and Output?," Crawford School Research Papers, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University 1307, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  3. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Janda, Karel, 2011. "Demand for gasoline is more price-inelastic than commonly thought," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley qt0m94j50t, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  4. T.D. Stanley & Hristos Doucouliagos, 2013. "Better than Random: Weighted Least Squares Meta-Regression Analysis," Economics Series 2013_2, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  5. Bruno, Randolph Luca & Campos, Nauro F, 2013. "Reexamining the Conditional Effect of Foreign Direct Investment," IZA Discussion Papers 7458, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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