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Spatial Inequalities Explained: Evidence from Burkina Faso

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  • Johannes Gräb
  • Michael Grimm

Abstract

Empirical evidence suggests that regional disparities in incomes are often very high, that these disparities do not necessarily disappear as economies grow and that these disparities are itself an important driver of growth. We use a novel approach based on multilevel modeling to decompose the sources of spatial disparities in incomes among households in Burkina Faso. We show that spatial disparities are not only driven by the spatial concentration of households with particular endowments but to a large extent also by disparities in community endowments. Climatic differences across regions due also matter, but to a much smaller extent.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.92166.de/dp843.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 843.

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Length: 32 p.
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp843

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Keywords: Spatial inequality; poverty; multilevel modeling; decomposition; Sub-Saharan Africa;

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  12. Michael Grimm & Isabel Günther, 2007. "Growth and Poverty in Burkina Faso: A Reassessment of the Paradox," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(1), pages 70-101, January.
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