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Migration and Money - What Determines Remittances?: Evidence from Germany

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  • Elke Holst
  • Mechthild Schrooten

Abstract

The determinants of migrants' remittances are the subject of this study based on German SOEP data. For our analysis of the probability and amount of remittances, we do not restrict ourselves on immigrants with a foreign citizenship, but focus on all individuals with a migration background. Major findings are: first, the degree of integration into German society matters. Second, the probability to remit is not dominated by income. Third, foreigners living in Germany are not a homogenous group concerning their remittance behavior: people with Turkish and former Yugoslavian citizenship, who are facing a comparable strong pressure for return migration, remit significantly more than others. The study points to potentially interesting directions for future research: (a) deeper investigations of the extent to which the legal status of the migrant influences cross-border transfer behavior and (b) reconsidering the theoretical arguments since the motive for remittances might have changed during the ongoing globalization process..

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.44138.de/dp566.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 566.

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Length: 22 p.
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp566

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Keywords: Remittances; international migration; altruism;

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References

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  1. Elke Holst & Dean R. Lillard & Thomas A. DiPrete, 2001. "Proceedings of the 2000 Fourth International Conference of German Socio-Economic Panel Study Users (GSOEP 2000): Editorial Introduction," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 5-6.
  2. Stark, Oded & Wang, You Qiang, 2002. "Migration dynamics," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 159-164, July.
  3. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier, Elsevier.
  4. Leah Vanwey, 2004. "Altruistic and contractual remittances between male and female migrants and households in rural Thailand," Demography, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 739-756, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Jorge Eduardo Mendoza Cota, 2012. "Are remittances a stabilizing factor in the Mexican economy?," EconoQuantum, Revista de Economia y Negocios, Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Economico Administrativas, Departamento de Metodos Cuantitativos y Maestria en Economia., vol. 9(1), pages 83-99, Enero-Jun.
  2. Holst, Elke & Schäfer, Andrea & Schrooten, Mechthild, 2011. "Remittances and Gender: Theoretical Considerations and Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 5472, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Hagen-Zanker, Jessica, 2010. "Modest expectations: Causes and effects of migration on migrant households in source countries," MPRA Paper 29507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Möllers, Judith & Meyer, Wiebke & Xhema, Sherif & Buchenrieder, Gertrud, 2013. "A socio-economic picture of Kosovar migrants and their origin farm households," IAMO Discussion Papers 140, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO).
  5. Monica Roman, 2013. "Financial Effects of the International Migration in Europe: Modelling the Decision to Remit," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(4), pages 541-555, June.
  6. Diego Battistón, 2010. "Remesas y Migración Internacional en América Latina: Simulación de los Efectos en la Pobreza y la Desigualdad," CEDLAS, Working Papers, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata 0110, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  7. Elke Holst & Andrea Schäfer & Mechthild Schrooten, 2010. "Gender, Transnational Networks and Remittances: Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1005, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  8. Meyer, Wiebke, 2012. "Motives for remitting from Germany to Kosovo," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Central and Eastern Europe, Leib­niz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO), volume 69, number 69.
  9. Mouhoud, El Mouhoub & Miotti, Luis & Oudinet, Joël, 2009. "Determinants of remittances to Southern Mediterranean countries : when History matters ! The teachings of two new surveys," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/5559, Paris Dauphine University.
  10. Mouhoud, El Mouhoub & Miotti, Luis & Oudinet, Joël, 2009. "Migration and Determinants of Remittances to Southern Mediterranean Countries: when history matters! Insights of two new surveys," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/2574, Paris Dauphine University.
  11. Lee, Sang-Hyop & Sukrakarn, Nopparat & Choi, Jin-Young, 2011. "Repeat migration and remittances: Evidence from Thai migrant workers," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 142-151, April.
  12. Amar Iqbal Anwar & Mazhar Yaseen Mughal, 2012. "Motives to remit: some microeconomic evidence from Pakistan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(1), pages 574-585.
  13. Zizi GOSCHIN & Monica ROMAN, 2012. "Determinants of the remitting behaviour of Romanian emigrants in an economic crisis context," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 3, pages 87-103, December.
  14. Luis Miotti & El Mouhoub Mouhoud & Joel Oudinet, 2009. "Migrations And Determinants Of Remittances To Southern Mediterranean Countries: When History Matters !," Post-Print hal-00483303, HAL.

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