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Occupational Choice across Generations

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  • Amelie Constant
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

Abstract

There are few studies on occupational choices in Germany, and the second generation occupational choice and mobility is even less investigated. Such research is important because occupations determine success in the labor market. In a country like Germany occupations also reflect a general socio-economic standing. This paper looks at the patterns of employment in Germany, analyzes how individual men and women access jobs given their family background, and investigates why men and women have different occupational distributions. Based on the German Socio-Economic Panel we estimate multinominal logit models of occupational choice for thechildren of immigrants as well as for the natives. Our findings are surprisingly similar for both natives and immigrants. For both Germans and immigrants, we find that gender significantly and differentially affects occupational choice, and that individuals with more education choose higher ranking jobs. The role of experience is important for natives and qualified individuals only. Germans are more likely to choose occupations similar to their fathers' occupation when their father is in the white collar or professional category. In stark contrast, the immigrants occupational choice is more influenced by their mother's education and not by their fathers' occupation.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.41199.de/dp395.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 395.

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Length: 28 p.
Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp395

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Keywords: Occupational choice; Intergenerational issues; Human capital; Migration;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Larry L. Howard & Nishith Prakash, 2012. "Do employment quotas explain the occupational choices of disadvantaged minorities in India?," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 489-513, August.
  2. Corneo, Giacomo, 2013. "Work norms, social insurance and the allocation of talent," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 79-92.
  3. Ham, Roger & Junankar, Pramod N. (Raja) & Wells, Robert, 2009. "Occupational Choice: Personality Matters," IZA Discussion Papers 4105, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Chakraborty, Shankha & Thompson, Jon & Yehoue, Etienne, 2014. "The Culture of Entrepreneurship," MPRA Paper 56892, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Hammermann, Andrea & Mohnen, Alwine, 2012. "Who Benefits from Benefits? Empirical Research on Tangible Incentives," IZA Discussion Papers 6284, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. John, Katrin & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2012. "Heterogeneous Returns to Personality - The Role of Occupational Choice," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP), Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät dp-495, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.

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