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Do Current Income and Annual Income Measures Provide Different Pictures of Britain's Income Distribution?

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  • René Böheim
  • Stephen P. Jenkins

Abstract

Most UK surveys, including those used each year to derive the official UK income distribution statistics ('Households Below Average Income'), provide measures of current household income rather than annual household income, which is the measure used in most other countries. Using British Household Panel Survey data, we examine whether estimates of Britain's income distribution and its trends are sensitive to the choice between current and annual income measures. The main finding is that current and annual income measures provide remarkably similar results. We explore why.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.38600.de/dp214.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 214.

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Length: [Getr. Zählung] p.
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp214

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References

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  1. Andrew Chesher & Christian Schluter, 2001. "Welfare measurement and measurement error," CeMMAP working papers CWP03/01, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  2. Jarvis, Sarah & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1998. "How Much Income Mobility Is There in Britain?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 428-43, March.
  3. Shorrocks, Anthony, 1978. "Income inequality and income mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 376-393, December.
  4. Ravallion, Martin, 1988. "Expected Poverty under Risk-Induced Welfare Variability," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(393), pages 1171-82, December.
  5. Morris, Nick & Preston, Ian, 1986. "Inequality, Poverty and the Redistribution of Income," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 275-344, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Frick, Joachim R. & Grabka, Markus M., 2001. "Der Einfluß von Imputed Rent auf die personelle Einkommensverteilung," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 285-308.
  2. repec:ese:iserwp:2001-02 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Joachim R. Frick & Markus M. Grabka & Eva M. Sierminska, 2007. "Representative Wealth Data for Germany from the German SOEP: The Impact of Methodological Decisions around Imputation and the Choice of the Aggregation Unit," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 672, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Suzie Ballantyne & Simon Chapple & David C. Maré & Jason Timmins, 2003. "Movements Into and Out of Child Poverty in New Zealand: Results from the Linked Income Supplement," Working Papers 03_13, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  5. Dean Hyslop & Suresh Yahanpath, 2006. "Income Growth and Earnings Variations in New Zealand, 1998-2004," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 39(3), pages 293-311, 09.
  6. Dickens & David T. Ellwood, 2004. "Whither Poverty in Great Britain and the United States? The Determinants of Changing Poverty and Whether Work Will Work," NBER Chapters, in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 313-370 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Francesco Devicienti, 2002. "Poverty persistence in Britain: A multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991–1997," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 307-340, December.
  8. Whitehouse, Edward, 2000. "How Poor are the Old? A Survey of Evidence from 44 Countries," MPRA Paper 14177, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Disney, Richard & Whitehouse, Edward, 2001. "Cross-country comparisons of pensioners’ incomes," MPRA Paper 16345, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Joachim R. Frick & Markus M. Grabka, 2000. "Personelle Einkommensverteilung und der Einfluß von Imputed Rent," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 225, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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