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Financial Support for Families with Children and Its Trade-Offs: Balancing Redistribution and Parental Work Incentives

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  • Michal Myck
  • Anna Kurowska
  • Michal Kundera

Abstract

Financial support for families with children implies inherent trade-offs some of which are less obvious than others. In the end these trade-offs determine the effectiveness of policy with respect to the material situation of families and employment of their parents. We analyse several kinds of trade-offs involved using a careful selection of potential changes to the system of financial support for families with children. We focus on: 1) the trade-off between redistribution of income to poorer households and improving work incentives, 2) the trade-off between improving work incentives for first and for second earners in couples, 3) the trade-off between improving work incentives for those facing strong and weak incentives in the baseline system. The exercise is conducted on data from Poland, a country characterized by high levels of child poverty, low female employment and one of the lowest fertility rates in Europe. We demonstrate the complexity of potential consequences of family support policy and stress the need for well-defined policy goals and careful analysis ahead of any reform.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 1315.

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Length: 33 p.
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1315

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Keywords: labour supply; tax and benefit reforms; microsimulation; family policy;

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  1. Peter Whiteford & Willem Adema, 2007. "What Works Best in Reducing Child Poverty: A Benefit or Work Strategy?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 51, OECD Publishing.
  2. Immervoll, Herwig & Kleven, Henrik & Kreiner, Claus Thustrup & Saez, Emmanuel, 2004. "Welfare Reform in European Countries: A Micro-Simulation Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 4324, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Edith Duclos & Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan, 2001. "A 'Natural Experiment' on the Economics of Storks: Evidence on the Impact of Differential Family Policy on Fertility Rates in Canada," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 136, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  4. repec:nbp:journl:v:41:y:2010:i:3:p:5-34 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Blundell, Richard, 2001. "Welfare Reform for Low Income Workers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(2), pages 189-214, April.
  6. Olivier Bargain & Kristian Orsini, 2004. "In-work policies in Europe: killing two birds with one stone?," DELTA Working Papers 2004-13, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  7. Viktor Steiner & Katharina Wrohlich, 2004. "Household Taxation, Income Splitting and Labor Supply Incentives: A Microsimulation Study for Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 421, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  8. Helene Dearing & Helmut Hofer & Christine Lietz & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Katharina Wrohlich, 2007. "Why are mothers working longer hours in Austria than in Germany? A comparative micro simulation analysis," Economics working papers 2007-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  9. Levy, Horacio & Morawski, Leszek & Myck, Michal, 2008. "Alternative tax-benefit strategies to support children in Poland," EUROMOD Working Papers EM3/08, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  10. Michal Myck & Howard Reed, 2006. "Tax and Benefit Reforms in a Model of Labour Market Transitions," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 75(3), pages 208-239.
  11. Brewer, Mike & Duncan, Alan & Shephard, Andrew & Suarez, Maria Jose, 2006. "Did working families' tax credit work? The impact of in-work support on labour supply in Great Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 699-720, December.
  12. Leszek Morawski & Michal Myck, 2008. "'Klin'-ing up: effects of Polish tax reforms on those in and on those out," IFS Working Papers W08/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  13. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Julian McCrae & Costas Meghir, 2000. "The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 75-103, March.
  14. Haan, Peter & Myck, Michal, 2008. "Multi-Family Households in a Labour Supply Model: A Calibration Method with Application to Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 3611, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Anne Gauthier, 2007. "The impact of family policies on fertility in industrialized countries: a review of the literature," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 323-346, June.
  16. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2006. "Fertility and women’s employment: a meta-analysis," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-048, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  17. Tom Clark & Andrew Dilnot & Alissa Goodman & Michal Myck, 2002. "Taxes and Transfers 1997--2001," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(2), pages 187-201, June.
  18. Bargain, Olivier & Morawski, Leszek & Myck, Michal & Socha, Mieczyslaw, 2007. "As SIMPL As That: Introducing a Tax-Benefit Microsimulation Model for Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 2988, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  19. Peter Haan & Michal Myck, 2007. "Apply with Caution: Introducing UK-Style In-Work Support in Germany," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 28(1), pages 43-72, 03.
  20. Stuart Adam & James Browne, 2010. "Redistribution, work incentives and thirty years of UK tax and benefit reform," IFS Working Papers W10/24, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  21. Tom Kornstad & Thor Thoresen, 2007. "A discrete choice model for labor supply and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 781-803, October.
  22. Duncan, Alan & Giles, Christopher, 1996. "Labour Supply Incentives and Recent Family Credit Reforms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(434), pages 142-55, January.
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