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The Educational Bias in Commuting Patterns: Micro-Evidence for the Netherlands

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Author Info

  • Stefan P.T. Groot

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Henri L.F. de Groot

    (VU University Amsterdam, and Ecorys NEI)

  • Paolo Veneri

    (OECD, Paris)

Abstract

This study analyses the relation between education and commuting behaviour of Dutch workers. Results show that, ceteris paribus, higher educated workers commute further, both in terms of distance and time. In addition, higher educated workers are more frequent users of public transport and of bicycles. Furthermore, we find that higher educated workers are relatively more likely to commute towards agglomerated areas and areas that pay relatively high wages, while they are more likely to live in and commute from areas with higher land rents.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 12-080/3.

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Date of creation: 30 Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20120080

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Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

Related research

Keywords: commuting; education; urban amenities; agglomeration;

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  1. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1995. "Activity, Travel, and the Allocation of Time," Working Papers 199505, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  2. Eva Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau & Jos van Ommeren, 2009. "Labour Supply and Commuting," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 222, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  3. Colin Vance & Ralf Hedel, 2008. "On the Link Between Urban Form and Automobile Use: Evidence from German Survey Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(1), pages 51-65.
  4. Jan Rouwendal, 2004. "Search Theory and Commuting Behavior," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 35(3), pages 391-418.
  5. David T. Ory & Patricia L. Mokhtarian & Lothlorien S. Redmond & Ilan Salomon & Gustavo O. Collantes & Sangho Choo, 2004. "When is Commuting Desirable to the Individual?," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 35(3), pages 334-359.
  6. Jan Rouwendal & Willemijn van der Straaten, 2003. "Dual Earners, Urban Labor Markets and Housing Demand," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-084/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  7. Stefan P.T. Groot & Henri L.F. de Groot & Martijn Smit, 2011. "Regional Wage Differences in the Netherlands: Micro-Evidence on Agglomeration Externalities," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-050/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  8. Jos Van Ommeren & Michiel Van Leuvensteijn, 2005. "New Evidence of the Effect of Transaction Costs on Residential Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 681-702.
  9. Giuliano, Genevieve, 1989. "New Directions for Understanding Transportation and Land Use," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt72f0362d, University of California Transportation Center.
  10. Genevieve Giuliano & Kenneth A. Small, 1993. "Is the Journey to Work Explained by Urban Structure?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 30(9), pages 1485-1500, November.
  11. Viktor Venhorst & Jouke Van Dijk & Leo Van Wissen, 2011. "An Analysis of Trends in Spatial Mobility of Dutch Graduates," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 57-82.
  12. Colin Vance & Ralf Hedel, 2006. "On the Link between Urban Form and Automobile Use - Evidence from German Survey Data," RWI Discussion Papers 0048, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
  13. Jan Rouwendal & Peter Nijkamp, 2004. "Living in Two Worlds: A Review of Home-to-Work Decisions," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 35(3), pages 287-303.
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