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Childhood Intelligence and Adult Mortality, and the Role of Socio-Economic Status

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  • Jan S. Cramer

    ()
    (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

The initial purpose of this study was to establish the effect of childhood conditions on longevity from the Brabant data set. This data set combines information at ages 12, 43, 53 and mortality between 53 and 71 for a sample of some 3000 individuals born around 1940 in the Dutch province of North Brabant. Proportional hazard analysis confirms the known association of early intelligence or cognitive ability with longevity, with a standardized hazard ratio of .80; this is the only significant childhood influence. Among men, the effect of some elements of adult socio-economic status can also be ascertained: education, income and wealth are each found to contribute about as much to a longer life as intelligence. The joint effect of all four variables is dominated by childhood intelligence and adult wealth at the expense of education and income.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 12-070/4.

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Date of creation: 17 Jul 2012
Date of revision: 30 Oct 2013
Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20120070

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Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

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Keywords: Cognitive ability; mortality; socio-economic status; proportional hazards;

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  1. van Ophem, Hans & Hartog, Joop & Vijverberg, Wim P M, 1993. "Job Complexity and Wages," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(4), pages 853-72, November.
  2. van Praag, C M & Cramer, J S, 2001. "The Roots of Entrepreneurship and Labour Demand: Individual Ability and Low Risk Aversion," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(269), pages 45-62, February.
  3. Hartog, Joop & Pfann, Gerard & Ridder, Geert, 1989. "(Non-)graduation and the earnings function : An inquiry on self-selection," European Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1373-1395, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Govert Bijwaard & Hans van Kippersluis & Justus Veenman, 2013. "Education and Health: The Role of Cognitive Ability," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 13-044/V, Tinbergen Institute.

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