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Door-to-Door Travel Times in RP Departure Time Choice Models: An Approximation Method based on GPS

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Author Info

  • Stefanie Peer

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Jasper Knockaert

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Paul Koster

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Yin-Yen Tseng

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Erik Verhoef

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

A common way to determine values of travel time and schedule delay is to estimate departure time choice models, using stated preference (SP) or revealed preference (RP) data. The latter are used less frequently, mainly because of the difficulties to collect the data required for the model estimation. One main requirement is knowledge of the (expected) travel times for both chosen and unchosen departure time alternatives. As the availability of such data is limited, most RP-based scheduling models only take into account travel times on trip segments rather than door-to-door travel times, or use very rough measures of door-to-door travel times. We show that ignoring the temporal and spatial variation of travel times, and, in particular, the correlation of travel times across links may lead to biased estimates of the value of time (VOT). To approximate door-to-door travel times for which no complete measurement is possible, we develop a method that relates travel times on links with continuous speed measurements to travel times on links where relatively infrequent GPS-based speed measurements are available. We use geographically weighted regression to estimate the location-specific relation between the speeds on these two types of links, which is then used for travel time prediction at different locations, days, and times of the day. This method is not only useful for the approximation of door-to-door travel times in departure time choice models, but is generally relevant for predicting travel times in situations where continuous speed measurements can be enriched with GPS data.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 11-180/3.

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Date of creation: 22 Dec 2011
Date of revision: 25 Aug 2014
Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20110180

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Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

Related research

Keywords: Valuation of travel time and schedule delays; door-to-door travel times; departure time choice; revealed preference (RP) data; door-to-door travel times; geographically weighted regression (GWR); GPS data;

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References

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  1. Qi Li & Jeffrey Scott Racine, 2006. "Nonparametric Econometrics: Theory and Practice," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, Princeton University Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 8355.
  2. Hensher, David A., 2010. "Hypothetical bias, choice experiments and willingness to pay," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 44(6), pages 735-752, July.
  3. Kenneth A. Small & Clifford Winston & Jia Yan, 2005. "Uncovering the Distribution of Motorists' Preferences for Travel Time and Reliability," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 73(4), pages 1367-1382, 07.
  4. Vickrey, William S, 1969. "Congestion Theory and Transport Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 251-60, May.
  5. Yin-Yen Tseng & Jasper Knockaert & Erik T. Verhoef, 2010. "Stick to the Plan? A Revealed-Preference Study of Behavioural Impacts of Traffic Information," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 10-068/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Small, Kenneth A, 1987. "A Discrete Choice Model for Ordered Alternatives," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 409-24, March.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Paul Koster & Hans Koster, 2013. "Commuters' Preferences for Fast and Reliable Travel," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 13-075/VIII, Tinbergen Institute, revised 24 Jun 2013.
  2. Paul Koster & Hans Koster, 2013. "Analysing Heterogeneity in the Value of Travel Time and Reliability: A Semiparametric Estimation Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1032, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Stefanie Peer & Erik Verhoef & Jasper Knockaert & Paul Koster & Yin-Yen Tseng, 2011. "Long-Run vs. Short-Run Perspectives on Consumer Scheduling: Evidence from a Revealed-Preference Experiment among Peak-Hour Road Commuters," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 11-181/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 25 Aug 2014.

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