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Behaviour of Humans and Behaviour of Models in Dynamic Space

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  • Peter Nijkamp

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

This paper addresses new trends in quantitative geography research. Modern social science research - including economic and social geography - has in the past decades shown an increasing interest in micro-oriented behaviour of actors. This is inter alia clearly reflected in spatial interaction models (SIMs), where discrete choice approaches have assumed a powerful position. This paper aims to provide in particular a concise review of micro-based research, with the aim to review the potential - but also the caveats - of micro models to map out human behaviour. In particular, attention will be devoted to interactive learning principles that shape individual decisions. Lessons from cognitive sciences will be put forward and illustrated, amongst others on the basis of computational neural networks or spatial econometric approaches. The methodology of deductive reasoning under conditions of large data bases in studying human mobility will be questioned as well. In this context more extensive attention is given to ceteris paribus conditions and evolutionary thinking.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 11-105/3.

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Date of creation: 28 Jul 2011
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20110105

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Keywords: Quantitative geography; spatial interaction models; neural networks;

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  1. J. Elhorst, 2010. "Applied Spatial Econometrics: Raising the Bar," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 9-28.
  2. Ron A. Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2005. "Why is economic geography not an evolutionary science? Towards an evolutionary economic geography," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0501, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Feb 2005.
  3. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. H Couclelis, 1997. "From cellular automata to urban models: new principles for model development and implementation," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 24(2), pages 165-174, March.
  5. Jan G. Lambooy & Ron Boschma, 1998. "Evolutionary economics and regional policy," ERSA conference papers ersa98p489, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Claes Andersson & Koen Frenken & Alexander Hellervik, 2005. "A complex network approach to urban growth," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0505, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Feb 2005.
  7. Persky, Joseph, 1990. "Retrospectives: Ceteris Paribus," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 187-93, Spring.
  8. van den Bergh, Jeroen C. J. M., 2004. "Optimal climate policy is a utopia: from quantitative to qualitative cost-benefit analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 385-393, April.
  9. Nijkamp, Peter, 2007. "Ceteris paribus, spatial complexity and spatial equilibrium: An interpretative perspective," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 509-516, July.
  10. G�ran Therborn & K.C. Ho, 2009. "Introduction," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 53-62, March.
  11. Sean P Gorman & Rajendra Kulkarni, 2004. "Spatial small worlds: new geographic patterns for an information economy," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(2), pages 273-296, March.
  12. Ron A. Boschma & Jan G. Lambooy, 1999. "Evolutionary economics and economic geography," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 411-429.
  13. Marshall, Alfred, 1890. "The Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number marshall1890.
  14. Sierdjan Koster, 2007. "Applied evolutionary economics and economic geography - Edited by Koen Frenken," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(4), pages 661-663, November.
  15. Ron Boschma, 2004. "Competitiveness of Regions from an Evolutionary Perspective," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(9), pages 1001-1014.
  16. Mark Casson, 2009. "The Efficiency of the Victorian British Railway Network: A Counterfactual Analysis," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 339-378, September.
  17. Daniel Arribas-Bel & Peter Nijkamp & Henk Scholten, 2011. "Multi-Dimensional Urban Sprawl in Europe: a Self-Organizing Map Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa10p485, European Regional Science Association.
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