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Learning in a Local Interaction Hawk-Dove Game

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  • Jurjen Kamphorst

    ()
    (Faculty of Law, Leiden University)

  • Gerard van der Laan

    ()
    (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

Abstract

We study how players in a local interaction hawk dove game will learn, if they can either imitate the most succesful player in the neighborhood or play a best reply versus the opponent's previous action. From simulations it appears that each learning strategy will be used, because each performs better when it is less popular. Despite that, clustering may occur if players choose their learning strategy on the basis of largely similar information. Finally, on average players will play Hawk with a probability larger than in the mixed Nash equilibrium of the stage game.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 06-034/1.

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Date of creation: 29 Mar 2006
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20060034

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Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

Related research

Keywords: Learning; Local Interaction; Hawk-Dove game;

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