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Reciprocity and Emotions: Arousal, Self-Reports, and Expectations

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Author Info

  • Gershon Ben-Shakhar

    ()
    (Department of Psychology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

  • Gary Bornstein

    ()
    (Department of Psychology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

  • Astrid Hopfensitz

    ()
    (Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Universiteit van Amsterdam)

  • Frans van Winden

    ()
    (Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Universiteit van Amsterdam)

Abstract

Although reciprocity is a key concept in the social sciences, it is still unclear why people engage in costly reciprocation. In this study, physiological and self-report measures were employed to investigate the role of emotions, using the Power-to-Take Game. In this 2-person game, player 1 can claim any part of player 2's resources, and player 2 can react by destroying some (or all) of these resources thus preventing their transfer to player 1. Both physiological and self-report measures were related to destruction decisions and expectations. The pattern of emotional arousal and its correlation with self-reported anger highlights the importance of using both techniques for studying reciprocity. This discussion paper has led to a publication in Journal of Public Psychology (2007) 28, 314-23.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 04-099/1.

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Date of creation: 07 Sep 2004
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20040099

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Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

Related research

Keywords: emotions; bargaining; laboratory experiment; expectations; reciprocity; physiological arousal; self-report measures of emotions;

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References

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  1. Colin Camerer & George Loewenstein & Drazen Prelec, 2003. "Neuroeconomics: How neuroscience can inform economics," Levine's Bibliography 506439000000000484, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Armin Falk & Ernst Fehr & Urs Fischbacher, . "On the Nature of Fair Behavior," IEW - Working Papers, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich 017, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  3. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
  4. Jon Elster, 1998. "Emotions and Economic Theory," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 47-74, March.
  5. Ernst Fehr & Simon Gaechter, 2003. "Altruistic Punishment in Humans," Microeconomics, EconWPA 0305006, EconWPA.
  6. Guth, Werner & Schmittberger, Rolf & Schwarze, Bernd, 1982. "An experimental analysis of ultimatum bargaining," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 367-388, December.
  7. Ronald Bosman & Frans van Winden, 2002. "Emotional Hazard in a Power-to-take Experiment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(476), pages 147-169, January.
  8. George Loewenstein, 2000. "Emotions in Economic Theory and Economic Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 426-432, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Ernesto Reuben & Frans van Winden, 2004. "Reciprocity and Emotions when Reciprocators know each other," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 04-098/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  2. Ernesto Reuben & Frans van Winden, . "Social Ties and Coordination on Negative Reciprocity: The Role of Affect," Discussion Papers 06-08, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  3. Biel, Anders & Johansson-Stenman, Olof & Nilsson, Andreas, 2006. "Emotions, Morality and Public Goods: The WTA-WTP Disparity Revisited," Working Papers in Economics, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics 193, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  4. Astrid Hopfensitz & Ernesto Reuben, 2009. "The Importance of Emotions for the Effectiveness of Social Punishment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(540), pages 1534-1559, October.
  5. Peter Duersch & Maros Servátka, 2007. "Risky Punishment and Reward in the Prisoner’s Dilemma," Working Papers, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics 0451, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2007.
  6. Fehr, Ernst & Schmidt, Klaus M., 2005. "The Economics of Fairness, Reciprocity and Altruism – Experimental Evidence and New Theories," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University 66, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
  7. Ernesto Reuben & Frans van Winden, 2005. "Negative Reciprocity and the Interaction of Emotions and Fairness Norms," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 05-014/1, Tinbergen Institute.

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