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Emotions and Economic Shocks in a First-Price Auction

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  • Ronald Bosman

    ()
    (De Nederlandsche Bank)

  • Arno Riedl

    ()
    (Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

We investigate experimentally whether emotions affect bidding behavior in a firstprice auction. To induce emotions, we confront subjects after a first auction series with apositive or negative random economic shock. We then explore the relation between emotions andbidding behavior in a second auction series. Our main results are: (i) the economic shock has asubstantial impact on the experienced emotions of bidders; (ii) the emotional statesystematically influences bidding behavior. In particular, negative emotions induce morecompetitive bidding. Our findings show that for a good understanding of bidder behavior theemotions have to be taken into account.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 03-056/1.

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Date of creation: 19 Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20030056

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Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

Related research

Keywords: auction; economic shock; emotion; experiment.;

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References

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  1. Lucking-Reiley, David, 2000. "Auctions on the Internet: What's Being Auctioned, and How?," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 227-52, September.
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  11. Isaac, R Mark & James, Duncan, 2000. " Just Who Are You Calling Risk Averse?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 177-87, March.
  12. Ronald Bosman & Frans van Winden, 2002. "Emotional Hazard in a Power-to-take Experiment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(476), pages 147-169, January.
  13. Jon Elster, 1998. "Emotions and Economic Theory," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 47-74, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Peter Duersch & Maros Servátka, 2007. "Risky Punishment and Reward in the Prisoner’s Dilemma," Working Papers 0451, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2007.

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