Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Inside the Queue

Contents:

Author Info

  • Erik T. Verhoef

    ()
    (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

Abstract

This paper develops a continuous-time -continuous-place economic model of road trafficcongestion with a bottleneck, based on car-following theory. The model integrates twoarchetype congestion technologies used in the economics literature: 'static flow congestion',originating in the works of Pigou, and 'dynamic bottleneck congestion', pioneered byVickrey. Because a closed-form analytical solution of the formal model does not exist, itsbehaviour is explored using a simulation model. In a setting with endogenous departure timechoice and with a bottleneck along the route, it is shown that 'hypercongestion' can arise as adynamic -transitional and local- equilibrium phenomenon. Also dynamic toll schedules areexplored. It is found that a toll rule based on an intuitive dynamic and space-varyinggeneralization of the standard Pigouvian tax rule can hardly be improved upon. A naiveapplication of a toll schedule based on Vickrey 's bottleneck model, in contrast, appears toperform much worse and actually even reduces welfare in the numerical model.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://papers.tinbergen.nl/02062.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 02-062/3.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 28 Jun 2002
Date of revision: 27 May 2003
Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20020062

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tinbergen.nl

Related research

Keywords: congestion; road pricing; networks;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Matteo Richiardi, 2003. "The New Italian Road Code and the Virtues of the ‘Shame Lane’," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 31, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
  2. Arnott, Richard & Inci, Eren, 2008. "The Stability of Downtown Parking and Traffic Congestion," MPRA Paper 11786, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Verhoef, Erik T., 2005. "Speed-flow relations and cost functions for congested traffic: Theory and empirical analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(7-9), pages 792-812.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20020062. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Antoine Maartens (+31 626 - 160 892)).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.