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Attention and the Art of Scientific Publishing

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  • Arjo Klamer

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Hendrik P. van Dalen

    ()
    (Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Scientific Council for Government Policy)

Abstract

Attention is the coordination device, which makes modern science workthe way it does. A typical characteristic of attention in thescientific world is that those who seek attention are the same peoplewho are giving it. Another important feature within groups is theskewed distribution of attention. We discuss the effect thesecharacteristics have on scientific institutions. An important thesisis that scientists converge in clusters of likeminded scientists.Given the character of scientific organisation and communication weexpect that the digitalisation of scientific communication will notaffect the basic scientific institutions as the principles upon whichthe Internet and open source code projects function coincide more orless with the way science functions. The channelling of attentionwill remain an important issue as the flood of information in the ageof electronic publishing will only increase.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 01-022/1.

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Date of creation: 26 Feb 2001
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20010022

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  1. David Colander, 1994. "Vision, judgment, and disagreement among economists," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 43-56.
  2. Stigler, George J & Stigler, Stephen M & Friedland, Claire, 1995. "The Journals of Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 331-59, April.
  3. David M. Levy, 1988. "The Market for Fame and Fortune," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 20(4), pages 615-625, Winter.
  4. Scott Smart & Joel Waldfogel, 1996. "A Citation-Based Test for Discrimination at Economics and Finance Journals," NBER Working Papers 5460, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Aloysius Siow, 1991. "Are First Impressions Important in Academia?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 236-255.
  6. Hodgson, Geoffrey M & Rothman, Harry, 1999. "The Editors and Authors of Economics Journals: A Case of Institutional Oligopoly?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages F165-86, February.
  7. MacDonald, Glenn M, 1988. "The Economics of Rising Stars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(1), pages 155-66, March.
  8. Hendrik P. Dalen & Kène Henkens, 1999. "How Influential Are Demography Journals?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(2), pages 229-251.
  9. Josh Lerner & Jean Triole, 2000. "The Simple Economics of Open Source," NBER Working Papers 7600, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "The Economics of Superstars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 845-58, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Falkinger, Josef, 2005. "Limited Attention as the Scarce Resource in an Information-Rich Economy," IZA Discussion Papers 1538, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Pedro Cosme Vieira & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2006. "Are Finance, Management, and Marketing Autonomous Fields of Scientific Research? An Analysis Based on Journal Citations," FEP Working Papers 233, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  3. Josef Falkinger, 2008. "Limited Attention as a Scarce Resource in Information-Rich Economies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(532), pages 1596-1620, October.
  4. Boppart, Timo & Staub, Kevin, 2012. "Online accessibility of academic articles and the diversity of economics," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62040, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  5. Josef Falkinger, 2007. "Distribution and Use of Knowledge under the “Laws of the Web”," CESifo Working Paper Series 2154, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Yalcintas, Altug, 2013. "The Oomph in economic philosophy: a bibliometric analysis of the main trends, from the 1960s to the present," MPRA Paper 44191, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Rajeev Goel & Christoph Grimpe, 2013. "Active versus passive academic networking: evidence from micro-level data," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 116-134, April.
  8. Hendrik P. van Dalen & Arjo Klamer, 2005. "Is there such a Thing called Scientific Waste?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-005/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  9. Hendrik P. van Dalen & K�ne Henkens, 2004. "Signals in Science - On the Importance of Signaling in Gaining Attention in Science," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-113/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  10. Klaus Mohn, 2010. "Autism in Economics? A Second Opinion," Forum for Social Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 191-208, July.
  11. Huberman, Bernardo & Wu, Fang, 2006. "Comparative Advante and Efficient Advertising in the Attention Economy," MPRA Paper 928, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. João Faria & Rajeev Goel, 2010. "Returns to networking in academia," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 103-117, July.
  13. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 2003. "Pluralism in Economics: A Public Good or a Public Bad?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-034/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 18 May 2004.
  14. Hendrik P. Van Dalen & Kène Henkens, 2012. "What is on a Demographer’s Mind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(16), pages 363-408, May.

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