Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The 'machine breakers' and the industrial revolution

Contents:

Author Info

  • Nuvolari, A.

    (ECIS, Technical University of Eindhoven)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://cms.tm.tue.nl/Ecis/Files/papers/wp2000/eciswp27.pdf
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 404 Not Found. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Carolina Castaldi)
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) in its series Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series with number 00.11.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dgr:tuecis:0011

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://ecis.ieis.tue.nl/

Related research

Keywords: industrialization process; industrial revolution; innovation;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. N. F. R. Crafts & C. K. Harley, 1992. "Output growth and the British industrial revolution: a restatement of the Crafts-Harley view," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(4), pages 703-730, November.
  2. Dosi, Giovanni, 1982. "Technological paradigms and technological trajectories : A suggested interpretation of the determinants and directions of technical change," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 147-162, June.
  3. Landes, David S., 1986. "What Do Bosses Really Do?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(03), pages 585-623, September.
  4. Tunzelmann G. N. von, 1995. "Time-Saving Technical Change: The Cotton Industry in the English Industrial Revolution," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-27, January.
  5. Crafts, N. F. R., 1995. "Exogenous or Endogenous Growth? The Industrial Revolution Reconsidered," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(04), pages 745-772, December.
  6. Feinstein, Charles H., 1998. "Pessimism Perpetuated: Real Wages and the Standard of Living in Britain during and after the Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(03), pages 625-658, September.
  7. Antonio Ciccone, 1996. "Falling real wages during an industrial revolution," Economics Working Papers 195, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  8. Krusell, P. & Rios-Rull, J.V., 1993. "Vested Interests in a Positive Theory of Stagnation and Growth," Papers 547, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
  9. Griffiths, Trevor & Hunt, Philip A. & O'Brien, Patrick K., 1992. "Inventive Activity in the British Textile Industry, 1700–1800," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(04), pages 881-906, December.
  10. Bowles, Samuel, 1985. "The Production Process in a Competitive Economy: Walrasian, Neo-Hobbesian, and Marxian Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(1), pages 16-36, March.
  11. Dosi, Giovanni, 1988. "Sources, Procedures, and Microeconomic Effects of Innovation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(3), pages 1120-71, September.
  12. Clark, Gregory, 1994. "Factory Discipline," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(01), pages 128-163, March.
  13. Mokyr, Joel, 1994. "Cardwell's Law and the political economy of technological progress," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 561-574, September.
  14. Sullivan, Richard J., 1989. "England's Age of invention: The acceleration of patents and patentable invention during the industrial revolution," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 424-452, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Aken, van J.E., 2001. "Management research based on the paradigm of the design sciences: the quest for tested and grounded technological rules," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 01.11, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).
  2. Klemp, Marc P B & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2012. "Fecundity, Fertility and Family Reconstitution Data: The Child Quantity-Quality Trade-O Revisite," CEPR Discussion Papers 9121, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Aken, van J., 2001. "Improving the relevance of management research By developing tested and grounded technologiCAL RULES," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 01.19, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dgr:tuecis:0011. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Carolina Castaldi).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.