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Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Development

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  • Bezemer, Dirk
  • Dulleck, Uwe
  • Frijters, Paul

    (Groningen University)

Abstract

This paper develops a conceptual framework for the role of social capital in the political economy of innovation, growth and reform, with illustrations from developing and transition countries. It identifies separate but related roles for the individual and communal interpretations of social capital. It argues that economic growth via innovation requires the creative destruction of individual social capital linkages and discusses the roles of communal social capital and formal market institutions in the process. A negative externality associated with creative destruction implies the possibility of growth accelerations as well as growth traps.

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File URL: http://irs.ub.rug.nl/ppn/289322421
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management) in its series Research Report with number 05C09.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:rugsom:05c09

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  1. Paul Frijters & Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck, 2005. "Contacts, Social Capital and Market Institutions - A Theory of Development," Paul Frijters Discussion Papers 2005-1, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  2. Block, Steven A., 2002. "Political business cycles, democratization, and economic reform: the case of Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 205-228, February.
  3. Paul Frijters & Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck, 2004. "Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Growth," Paul Frijters Discussion Papers 2004, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  4. John Maluccio & Lawrence Haddad & Julian May, 2000. "Social capital and household welfare in South Africa, 1993-98," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 54-81.
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  7. Larry H. P. Lang & Mara Faccio & Leslie Young, 2001. "Dividends and Expropriation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 54-78, March.
  8. Diamond, Peter A, 1982. "Aggregate Demand Management in Search Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 881-94, October.
  9. Frijters, Paul, 2000. "The sale of relational capital through tenure profiles and tournaments," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 373-384, July.
  10. Cooke, Philip & Wills, David, 1999. " Small Firms, Social Capital and the Enhancement of Business Performance through Innovation Programmes," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 219-34, November.
  11. Temple, Jonathan, 1998. "Initial Conditions, Social Capital and Growth in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(3), pages 309-47, October.
  12. Routledge, Bryan R. & von Amsberg, Joachim, 2003. "Social capital and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 167-193, January.
  13. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
  14. Rama, Martin, 1993. "Rent seeking and economic growth : A theoretical model and some empirical evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 35-50, October.
  15. Greenaway, David & Morgan, Wyn & Wright, Peter, 2002. "Trade liberalisation and growth in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 229-244, February.
  16. Robison, Lindon J. & Schmid, A. Allan & Siles, Marcelo E., 1999. "Is Social Capital Really Capital?," Staff Papers 11649, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  17. Paul Mosley & Marina Della Giusta, 1999. "A model of social capital and access to productive resources," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(7), pages 921-934.
  18. Karen Buerkle & Alya Guseva, 2002. "What Do You Know, Who Do You Know?: School as a Site for the Production of Social Capital and its Effects on Income Attainment in Poland and the Czech Republic," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 657-680, 07.
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