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Why do organizational populations die? : evidence from the Belgian motorcycle industry, 1900-1993

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  • Wezel, Filippo Carlo

    (Groningen University)

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    Abstract

    Extinctions represent a potential outcome of the evolutionary processes of organizational populations. Nevertheless, scant effort, if none, has been dedicated to investigate this issue. This paper proposes three alternative hypotheses that may account for extinction events. They are drawn from very different literatures: economic geography, economic sociology, and evolutionary biology/paleontology. In particular, two of them rely on exogenous determinants, while one is focused on an endogenous reasoning. The theory presented is tested analyzing the entries of motorcycle producers in Belgium, a population that ceased to exist in 1981. The findings of this research provide evidence to support the internal causation of the event. The implications stemming from the present work are related to the literatures of population ecology and industrial economics.

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    File URL: http://irs.ub.rug.nl/ppn/240808630
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management) in its series Research Report with number 02G38.

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    Date of creation: 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:dgr:rugsom:02g38

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    1. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
    2. Krugman, Paul, 1993. "On the number and location of cities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 293-298, April.
    3. Krugman, Paul & Venables, Anthony J., 1994. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," CEPR Discussion Papers 1015, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Geroski, P A, 2001. "Exploring the Niche Overlaps between Organizational Ecology and Industrial Economics," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(2), pages 507-40, June.
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    1. Industrial Sociology (FCT-UNL)

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