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Anonymity in giving in a natural context : an economic field experiment in thirty churches

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  • Soetevent, Adriaan R.

    (Groningen University)

Abstract

The role of anonymity in giving is examined in a field experiment performed in thirty Dutch churches. For a period of 29 weeks, the means by which offerings are gathered is determined by chance, prescribing for each offering the use of either `closed' collection bags or open collection baskets. When using baskets, attendants' contributions can be identified by their direct neighbors, and attendants can observe the total amount given by the people who preceded them. Initially, contributions to the services' second offerings increase by 10% when baskets are used, whereas no effect is found for first offerings. The positive effect of using baskets peters out over the experimental period. Additional data on the coins collected show that in both offerings, people switch to giving larger coins when baskets are used.

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File URL: http://irs.ub.rug.nl/ppn/253175550
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research in its series CCSO Working Papers with number 200308.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:rugccs:200308

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Cited by:
  1. Dan Ariely & Anat Bracha & Stephan Meier, 2007. "Doing good or doing well? Image motivation and monetary incentives in behaving prosocially," Working Papers 07-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  2. David Reinstein & Gerhard Riener, 2012. "Reputation and influence in charitable giving: an experiment," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 72(2), pages 221-243, February.
  3. Nava Ashraf & Oriana Bandiera & Kelsey Jack, 2012. "No Margin, no Mission? A Field Experiment on Incentives for public service delivery," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 035, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  4. Lambarraa, Fatima & Riener, Gerhard, 2012. "On the Norms of Charitable Giving in Islam: A Field Experiment," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126795, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  5. Alpizar, Francisco & Carlsson, Fredrik & Johansson-Stenman, Olof, 2008. "Full title Does Context Matter More for Hypothetical Than for Actual Contributions? Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment," Discussion Papers dp-08-02-efd, Resources For the Future.
  6. David Reinstein & David Hugh-Jones, 2010. "The Benefit of Anonymity in Public Goods Games," Economics Discussion Papers 689, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  7. Alpizar, Francisco & Carlsson, Fredrik & Johansson-Stenman, Olof, 2007. "Anonymity, Reciprocity, and Conformity: Evidence from Voluntary Contributions to a National Park in Costa Rica," Working Papers in Economics 245, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  8. Tobias Regner & Gerhard Riener, 2013. "Voluntary Payments, Privacy and Social Pressure on the Internet: A Natural Field Experiment," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-032, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.

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