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The Miracle Drug: Hormone Replacement Therapy and Labor Market Behavior of Middle-Aged Women

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  • Daysal, N. Meltem
  • Orsini, C.

    (Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research)

Abstract

Abstract: In an aging society, determining which factors contribute to the employment of older individuals is increasingly important. This paper sheds light on the impact of medical innovation in the form of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on employment of middle-aged women. HRT are drugs taken by middle-aged women to soften symptoms related to menopause. Before 2002, HRT products were among the most popular prescription drugs in America. We use the timing of the release of information of the potential hazardous effects of HRT—uncovered in 2002 by the largest randomized trials on women ever undertaken—as an instrument for the purchase of the affected drugs within a Fixed Effect Instrumental Variable framework. We find that HRT use impacts employment: namely, that HRT use increases employment by 25 percentage points among middle-aged women who would have taken HRT but who do not take HRT after the release of information of its potential hazardous effects.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 2012-026.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:kubcen:2012026

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Web page: http://center.uvt.nl

Related research

Keywords: Employment of middle-aged women; Drug safety;

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References

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  1. Cathy Bradley & David Neumark & Heather Bednarek & Maryjean Schenk, 2004. "Short-term Effects of Breast Cancer on Labor Market Attachment: Results from a Longitudinal Study," PPIC Working Papers 2004.01, Public Policy Institute of California.
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  3. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 1-21, May.
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  8. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-in-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275, February.
  9. Sandra E. Black & Philip E. Strahan, 2001. "The Division of Spoils: Rent-Sharing and Discrimination in a Regulated Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 814-831, September.
  10. Currie, Janet & Madrian, Brigitte C., 1999. "Health, health insurance and the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 50, pages 3309-3416 Elsevier.
  11. Goldin, Claudia, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family," Scholarly Articles 2943933, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Jonah E. Rockoff & Mariesa A. Herrmann, 2010. "Does Menstruation Explain Gender Gaps in Work Absenteeism?," NBER Working Papers 16523, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Daysal, N. Meltem & Orsini, C., 2012. "Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Health Behavior," Discussion Paper 2012-025, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.

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