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Why is Price Discovery in Credit Default Swap Markets News-Specific?

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Author Info

  • Marsch, I.
  • Wagner, W.B.

    (Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research)

Abstract

Abstract: We analyse daily lead-lag patterns in US equity and credit default swap (CDS) returns. We first document that equity returns robustly lead CDS returns. However, we find that the CDSlag is due to common (and not firm-specific) news and arises predominantly in response to positive (instead of negative) equity market news. We provide an explanation for this newsspecific price discovery based on dealers in the CDS market exploiting their informational advantage vis-à-vis institutional investors with hedging demands. In support of this explanation we find that the CDS-lag and its newsspecificity are related to various firm-level proxies for hedging demand in the cross-section as well measures for economy-wide informational asymmetries over time.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 2012-006.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:kubcen:2012006

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Web page: http://center.uvt.nl

Related research

Keywords: price discovery; CDS; hedging demand; informational asymmetries;

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  1. Francis A. Longstaff & Sanjay Mithal & Eric Neis, 2004. "Corporate Yield Spreads: Default Risk or Liquidity? New Evidence from the Credit-Default Swap Market," NBER Working Papers 10418, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Downing, Chris & Underwood, Shane & Xing, Yuhang, 2009. "The Relative Informational Efficiency of Stocks and Bonds: An Intraday Analysis," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(05), pages 1081-1102, October.
  3. Bacon, Robert W., 1991. "Rockets and feathers: the asymmetric speed of adjustment of UK retail gasoline prices to cost changes," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 211-218, July.
  4. Kwan, Simon H., 1996. "Firm-specific information and the correlation between individual stocks and bonds," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 63-80, January.
  5. Acharya, Viral V & Johnson, Tim, 2005. "Insider Trading in Credit Derivatives," CEPR Discussion Papers 5180, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Richard C. Green & Dan Li & Norman Schürhoff, 2010. "Price Discovery in Illiquid Markets: Do Financial Asset Prices Rise Faster Than They Fall?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(5), pages 1669-1702, October.
  7. Mariano Tappata, 2009. "Rockets and feathers: Understanding asymmetric pricing," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 40(4), pages 673-687.
  8. Roberto Blanco & Simon Brennan & Ian W. Marsh, 2005. "An Empirical Analysis of the Dynamic Relation between Investment-Grade Bonds and Credit Default Swaps," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(5), pages 2255-2281, October.
  9. Sam Peltzman, 2000. "Prices Rise Faster than They Fall," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(3), pages 466-502, June.
  10. Kewei Hou, 2007. "Industry Information Diffusion and the Lead-lag Effect in Stock Returns," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 20(4), pages 1113-1138.
  11. Chordia, Tarun & Sarkar, Asani & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2011. "Liquidity Dynamics and Cross-Autocorrelations," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(03), pages 709-736, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Tölö , Eero & Jokivuolle, Esa & Viren, Matti, 2014. "Do private signals of a bank’s creditworthiness predict the bank’s CDS price? Evidence from the Eurosystem's overnight loan rates," Research Discussion Papers 9/2014, Bank of Finland.

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